PremiumMax B. Mentoring -Medical School Preparation- tutor, Mentoring -Oxbri...

Max B.

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Degree: Medicine (Bachelors) - Oxford, Hertford College University

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About me

Hi I'm Max and I'm a third year medical student at Oxford University. Science has always fascinated me but I know that at times it can be challenging so that's where I hope to help. I tutor in Biology, Chemistry, and English, as well as helping students with their university and medical school applications. I have tutored for 5 years, helping a range of students of all ages and backgrounds achieve their academic aims.

How will the sessions be run?

Tutorials will be guided by you. When you tell me what you would like to cover and the exam board you have, I can prepare to make our sessions as focused as possible. We will always start by understanding key concepts, science shouldn't just be about rote learning. I've always found mnemonics, analogies and visual techniques helpful so I will try to pass those on. We can then move on to past exam questions. Exam technique is key, knowing the facts is only half the story! Exam boards can only test you on something so many ways and so I find going over past papers the best way to find where knowledge gaps are. I have a huge bank of papers so don't worry if your teachers haven't given them to you yet. 

There is no silly question and I want all of my students to feel comfortable asking whatever they want in a session. 

Medical school and university applications

With a bit of hard graft I managed to get into Oxford, Newcastle and Birmingham medical schools. It's a tough process but manageable if you do the right preparation. I am also here to help share my experience and tips on how to maximise your chances. I offer help with the UKCAT, BMAT, personal statement writing and interview preparation.

I look forward to hearing from you! Book a 'meet the tutor session' or send me a webmail.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £30 /hr
Chemistry A Level £30 /hr
Biology GCSE £30 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £30 /hr
English GCSE £30 /hr
Science GCSE £30 /hr
-Medical School Preparation- Mentoring £30 /hr
-Oxbridge Preparation- Mentoring £30 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £30 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
ChemistryA-LevelA
BiologyA-LevelA
EnglishA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Ratings and reviews

5from 24 customer reviews

Amanda (Parent) September 14 2016

Max is a great support. Thank you Max for all your advice.

Maggy (Parent) February 21 2016

Great session, as always!

Maggy (Parent) November 5 2015

Really positive attitude to learning, great at building confidence.

Maggy (Parent) October 28 2015

Great session, thanks
See all reviews

Questions Max has answered

How is a message transferred across a synapse?

A synapse is a junction between the end of one neuron (known as the pre-synaptic neuron) and either another neuron (known as the post-synaptic neuron) or another tissue such as muscle (such as at the neuromuscular junction - the clue is in the name!). Either way, electrical signals are being ...

A synapse is a junction between the end of one neuron (known as the pre-synaptic neuron) and either another neuron (known as the post-synaptic neuron) or another tissue such as muscle (such as at the neuromuscular junction - the clue is in the name!). Either way, electrical signals are being transferred to chemical signals and then transferred back to electrical signals so that the original message can be passed on.

The word synapse ecompasses everything going on to transfer the signal at this junction. The synaptic cleft is the space in between the pre-synaptic terminal and the post-synaptic terminal. This space is tiny, only about 10-50nm (over 100 times smaller than a millimetre).

So how does it work?

The electrical signal - an action potential - arrives at pre-synaptic axon terminal. This opens channels that are known as voltage gated calcium channels. They are voltage gated becuase they respond to changes in voltage at the nerve terminal and they are calcium channels because only calcium ions can flow through them. 

When these channels open, calcium flows into the pre-synaptic terminal. Calcium then binds to a protein called synaptotagmin which detects the rise in calcium. This then leads to proteins known as the SNARE proteins to fuse. This SNARE protein complex guides vesicles of acetylcholine (a neurotransmitter) right to the end of the nerve terminal where they bind with the membrane and are released into the synaptic cleft. This is known as exocytosis. Acetylcholine diffuses across the cleft to the post synaptic terminal where it binds with receptors known as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The cleft is small so that the neurotransmitter reaches its target easily. When binding occurs, sodium flows through the channels, depolarising the membrane and causing muscle contraction to occur. 

When we have opertions, it is important that muscle contraction doesn't occur so drugs like tubocurarine act to block these receptors.

Botox is another example of disruption of the neuromuscular junction. Botox (actually called botulinum toxin) stops fusion of the vesicles with the membrane so exocytosis cannot occur. This paralyses the muscles and some people use this to smooth their skin or to stop twitches. 

Why have synapses at all? Why not just have direct electrical connections between nerves and muscle? Well, synapses hugely increase the diversity of signals that can be sent within the body. The best example is in the brain. An adult brain has one hundred billion neurons and each one of these has roughly 7000 synapses connecting with other neurons. Messages are sent and filtered via these synapses to allow normal functioning of the brain. New synapses are made all the time when we create memories or learn something new. Synapses are more easily made when we're young so that's why people say it's easier to learn languages when you're young. Synapses can be lost too, especially in diseases like Alzheimer's Disease which affects your memory.

I hope that is helpful. Looking at a picture of the process can make it easier to understand so check out your textbook or look up on google images.

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2 years ago

540 views

Is there any point me applying to Oxbridge?

Many people think they wont fit in or are not good enough to thrive at Oxbridge. This attitude is wrong and I want to explain why. I wasn't the brightest person at school and thought there was no way I would get into Oxford. I also thought what is the point in applying when you only get four ...

Many people think they wont fit in or are not good enough to thrive at Oxbridge. This attitude is wrong and I want to explain why. I wasn't the brightest person at school and thought there was no way I would get into Oxford. I also thought what is the point in applying when you only get four chances for medical schools (as apposed to 5), and medicine is crazily competitive anyway. Well I caved into pressure from my teachers and friends and applied. I thought the interviews went horribly and my BMAT score wouldn't be good enough. Somehow I got in and have loved every second at Oxford. It is a wonderfully inclusive environment and a managable workload that gives you time to all the other things you enjoy. I have thrived and are in the top quarter of my year academically which is something I never thought I could achieve. 

 

Give it a shot!

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2 years ago

347 views
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