Stuart A. A Level Chemistry tutor, Mentoring -Oxbridge Preparation- t...

Stuart A.

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Chemistry (Masters) - Oxford, Worcester College University

5.0
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3 reviews

This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

3 completed lessons

About me

Hi I'm Stuart, a first year Chemist at Worcester College, Oxford. Having always found the subject gripping and exciting (it is THE CENTRAL SCIENCE after all), and a long-term interest in teaching, I enjoy helping others improve their understanding of this amazing subject. With experience of tutoring at my school, I'm more than happy to give you any help you need with your A-Level Chemistry :)

Hi I'm Stuart, a first year Chemist at Worcester College, Oxford. Having always found the subject gripping and exciting (it is THE CENTRAL SCIENCE after all), and a long-term interest in teaching, I enjoy helping others improve their understanding of this amazing subject. With experience of tutoring at my school, I'm more than happy to give you any help you need with your A-Level Chemistry :)

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 3 customer reviews
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Rob (Parent from Colwyn Bay)

January 23 2017

Top drawer once again, thanks!

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Rob (Parent from Colwyn Bay)

January 2 2017

Extremely helpful, thank you!

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Andrew (Parent from Swansea)

December 1 2016

very helpful and friendly

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
MathsA-level (A2)A*
BiologyA-level (A2)A*
FrenchA-level (A2)A

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
ChemistryA Level£20 /hr
ChemistryIB£20 /hr
-Oxbridge Preparation-Mentoring£22 /hr

Questions Stuart has answered

Why are solutions of transition metal ions often coloured

Transition metal ions have, by definition, at least one partly filled d orbital (eg:3d). When in a solution, the positive charge of the transition metal ions can cause the lone elctron pairs of other molecules in the solution (such as water) to be attracted to the transition metal ion, leading to the formation of dative coordinate bond between the metal ion and the ligand - the name used to describe the molecule bonding the metal ion.

The bonding of the ligand molecules to the metal ion causes the energy level of some of the valence d orbitals to be increased, resulting in an energy gap between different valence d orbitals. Electrons in the lower level of d orbitals can absorb visible frequencies of light (which correspond to the energy gap between the orbitals by E=hv) to become excited and move to the higher energy level. This causes the solution to appear the complementary colour to that of the frequency of light absorbed.

Transition metal ions have, by definition, at least one partly filled d orbital (eg:3d). When in a solution, the positive charge of the transition metal ions can cause the lone elctron pairs of other molecules in the solution (such as water) to be attracted to the transition metal ion, leading to the formation of dative coordinate bond between the metal ion and the ligand - the name used to describe the molecule bonding the metal ion.

The bonding of the ligand molecules to the metal ion causes the energy level of some of the valence d orbitals to be increased, resulting in an energy gap between different valence d orbitals. Electrons in the lower level of d orbitals can absorb visible frequencies of light (which correspond to the energy gap between the orbitals by E=hv) to become excited and move to the higher energy level. This causes the solution to appear the complementary colour to that of the frequency of light absorbed.

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3 years ago

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