Sarah S. A Level German tutor, GCSE English Literature tutor, GCSE Ge...

Sarah S.

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Degree: English philology and politics (Bachelors) - Edinburgh University

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About me

Hi, I’m Sarah and I tutor German at GCSE, A-level and English Literature.

I'm an exchange student at the university of Edinburgh studying English Literature and Politics. I am originally from Berlin, where I study at Free University. I'm a German native speaker and very enthusiastic about sharing my knowledge about the language, country and culture! I have completed my A-Levels in German, English Literature and History and am very passionate about writing and reading. I am happy to tutor these two subject areas. I have done some tutoring in English before, so I know how to teach a foreign language. I’m very passionate about what I teach and want to make sure your individual needs are addressed. I am very patient.

 

What will I expect from the sessions?

During the sessions, I want to make sure that all of your questions that come up in class are covered - especially the ones that are crucial for your exams. Feel free to ask anything that is unclear or complicated, I believe one-to-one tutoring provides the space for in-depth understanding of German. It is important to set long-term goals as well as goals for each session, so as not only we have a structure and motivation, but also to see your progress over time. I believe, languages are most easily accessible by speaking and listening a lot, so these two parts will always be covered during sessions. However, writing and reading will also be important. Additionally, please look forward to some German cultural inputs that will make you enjoy German a lot more =)

As to English literature, I can help you with essay writing and provide knowledge of different eras in English and Scottish literature. My focus at university covers the periods from 1700 onwards. Expect interesting and engaging discussions about the literature, its backgrounds and its authors.

 

Feel free to get in touch with me and find out more!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
German A Level £20 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
German GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
EnglishA-LevelA*
GermanA-LevelA*
HistoryA-LevelA*
FrenchA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: no new students

Ratings and reviews

5from 1 customer review

Vivien (Parent) April 21 2015

Excellent preparation and communication.

Questions Sarah has answered

Where is the position of a verb in a sentence?

Verbs in a sentence are called Prädikate. The position of the Prädikat depends on whether we have a verb consisting of one, two or three parts.   * If a verb has one part, it takes the second position. This is the case for example in the tenses Präsens (present) and Präteritum (simple past)...

Verbs in a sentence are called Prädikate.

The position of the Prädikat depends on whether we have a verb consisting of one, two or three parts.

 

  1. If a verb has one part, it takes the second position. This is the case for example in the tenses Präsens (present) and Präteritum (simple past).

    Ich kaufe Kleider.

S V O

I buy clothes.

S V O

 

  1. If a verb has two parts this can have several reasons.

In the first case, it is in a tense that requires an auxiliary word like haben (have) or sein (be) (Perfekt, Plusquamperfekt, Futur I, Passiv). In these cases, the auxiliary word takes the second position in the sentence and the remaining part (Participle) takes the final position of the sentence.

 

Ich habe Kleider gekauft.

S auxV O V(participle)

 

I have bought clothes.

S auxV V(participle) O

 

Sometimes, verbs can have two parts even though they are in the present tense. In the infinitive, they are one word, however conjugated, they are separated.  They are often made of a stem word and a remaining part, which is mostly a preposition. The stem word, which will be conjugated, takes the second position of the sentence and the remaining part (unchanged) takes the final position.

Beispiele: einkaufen, losgehen, einstecken, herumlaufen, schwimmen gehen, ausbrechen

Examples: shop, go, put into pocket, walk around, go swimming, break out

 

Ich kaufe Kleider ein.

S V(conjugated) O V(unchanged)

 

I shop clothes.
S V O

  1. We have three parts only in the case of the tense Futur II. In this case, the conjugated auxiliary word is in the second position and the remaining parts are in the final position of the sentence, in the order of participle and then infinitive of either haben (have) or sein (be).

     

 

Ich werde nächte Woche eingekauft haben.

S V(aux) Adv Best V (participle) V(infinitive)

 

I will have shopped next week.

S V O

 

Abbreviations:

S – Subject

V – verb

O – Object

auxV – auxiliary verb

AdvBest – adverb

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2 years ago

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