Shashank P.

Shashank P.

£18 - £25 /hr

Mechanical Engineering (Bachelors) - Nottingham University

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93 completed lessons

About me

I’m a second-year mechanical engineering student. What I love about engineering is that it is a very balanced blend of the pure and applied fields of study. Some areas of maths which at first seem to have no real-world use, surprise us by appearing in physical phenomena as common as mechanical vibrations. As a result, I cannot stress enough the importance of having an appreciation of where a mathematical formula or physical law ‘comes from’. Working from first principles to find how a result is obtained can be an extremely rewarding journey, so I always aim to include in my lessons a derivation or proof of what I am about to teach. This stems from my own dissatisfaction when told to ‘take someone’s word for it’. I like to know how and why something works and I encourage students to not accept things at face value and to delve deeper for a better understanding. This approach towards learning has helped me greatly throughout my school career allowing me to think spontaneously, especially during exams, and efficiently obtain solutions to even novel problems.


Among my other interests are reading and politics. I am a member of my political party’s association at university and regularly attend the debates it hosts. In addition to this, I enjoy swimming to keep fit before I head to the Kettle Society to relish yet another new kind of tea. 

I’m a second-year mechanical engineering student. What I love about engineering is that it is a very balanced blend of the pure and applied fields of study. Some areas of maths which at first seem to have no real-world use, surprise us by appearing in physical phenomena as common as mechanical vibrations. As a result, I cannot stress enough the importance of having an appreciation of where a mathematical formula or physical law ‘comes from’. Working from first principles to find how a result is obtained can be an extremely rewarding journey, so I always aim to include in my lessons a derivation or proof of what I am about to teach. This stems from my own dissatisfaction when told to ‘take someone’s word for it’. I like to know how and why something works and I encourage students to not accept things at face value and to delve deeper for a better understanding. This approach towards learning has helped me greatly throughout my school career allowing me to think spontaneously, especially during exams, and efficiently obtain solutions to even novel problems.


Among my other interests are reading and politics. I am a member of my political party’s association at university and regularly attend the debates it hosts. In addition to this, I enjoy swimming to keep fit before I head to the Kettle Society to relish yet another new kind of tea. 

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About my sessions

My teaching style is very much inspired from that of my maths teacher, which I found to be very engaging and thought stimulating. My lessons start with asking the students how much they know on the topic at hand and whether they know why something is the way it is. Their answers help me assess where the gaps in their knowledge lie. I ask them questions on this to encourage them to think out loud while I provide them with prompts to guide their thinking in the right direction. Explaining topics this way, where the students have had to work for the result means that they are better able to retain this new information than if I were simply speaking to them. Additional practice outside lessons is also encouraged to consolidate the knowledge. Throughout the lesson, as new things of increasing difficultly are taught, I will be giving them questions to put the newly-learned skills to practice. For this to run smoothly, I will have prepared a bank of questions of a range of difficulties beforehand.


However, the lesson won’t be limited to only exploring a single topic. Related topics or applications of the topic will also be studied. I like to teach my subjects as webs of interconnected topics rather than giving them rigid, modular structures. This allows students to explore ‘how it all fits in together’ and leads to many epiphany moments when they ‘get it’.

My teaching style is very much inspired from that of my maths teacher, which I found to be very engaging and thought stimulating. My lessons start with asking the students how much they know on the topic at hand and whether they know why something is the way it is. Their answers help me assess where the gaps in their knowledge lie. I ask them questions on this to encourage them to think out loud while I provide them with prompts to guide their thinking in the right direction. Explaining topics this way, where the students have had to work for the result means that they are better able to retain this new information than if I were simply speaking to them. Additional practice outside lessons is also encouraged to consolidate the knowledge. Throughout the lesson, as new things of increasing difficultly are taught, I will be giving them questions to put the newly-learned skills to practice. For this to run smoothly, I will have prepared a bank of questions of a range of difficulties beforehand.


However, the lesson won’t be limited to only exploring a single topic. Related topics or applications of the topic will also be studied. I like to teach my subjects as webs of interconnected topics rather than giving them rigid, modular structures. This allows students to explore ‘how it all fits in together’ and leads to many epiphany moments when they ‘get it’.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Enhanced DBS Check

5 Jan, 2016

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Lara Parent from Grays

25 Oct, 2018

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathsA-level (A2)A
Further MathematicsA-level (A2)A
PhysicsA-level (A2)B
Additional Further Maths (AS equivalent)OtherA
Advanced Extensions Award in MathematicsOtherMERIT
.PAT.Uni admission test56
Computer Science (AS)OtherA

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrice
MathsA Level£22 /hr
Further MathematicsGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£18 /hr
Maths13 Plus£18 /hr
PATUniversity£25 /hr

Questions Shashank has answered

The curve C has equation f(x) = 4(x^1.5) + 48/(x^0.5) - 8^0.5 for x > 0. (a) Find the exact coordinates of the stationary point of C. (b) Determine whether the stationary point is a maximum or minimum.

Part a:f(x) = 4x1.5 + 48x-0.5 - 80.5Finding the gradient function, f'(x) = 6x0.5 - 24x-1.5At the stationary point, the gradient is zero, so f'(x) = 06x0.5 - 24x-1.5 = 06x2 - 24=0x2 = 4x = 2 is the solution. x = -2 is ignored as C is only defined for x > 0.f(2) = 4(2)1.5 + 48(2)-0.5 - 80.5 = 8(20.5) + 24(20.5) - 2(20.5) = (20.5)*(8+24-2) = 30(20.5) The stationary point is (2, 30(2^0.5)).===========================================Part b:To analyse concavity, we need the rate of change in the gradient, i.e. the second derivate:f''(x) = 3x-0.5 + 36x-2.5f''(2) = 3(2)-0.5 + 36(2)-2.5 > 0This means that at the stationary point, the gradient is increasing. The stationary point is a minimum.Part a:f(x) = 4x1.5 + 48x-0.5 - 80.5Finding the gradient function, f'(x) = 6x0.5 - 24x-1.5At the stationary point, the gradient is zero, so f'(x) = 06x0.5 - 24x-1.5 = 06x2 - 24=0x2 = 4x = 2 is the solution. x = -2 is ignored as C is only defined for x > 0.f(2) = 4(2)1.5 + 48(2)-0.5 - 80.5 = 8(20.5) + 24(20.5) - 2(20.5) = (20.5)*(8+24-2) = 30(20.5) The stationary point is (2, 30(2^0.5)).===========================================Part b:To analyse concavity, we need the rate of change in the gradient, i.e. the second derivate:f''(x) = 3x-0.5 + 36x-2.5f''(2) = 3(2)-0.5 + 36(2)-2.5 > 0This means that at the stationary point, the gradient is increasing. The stationary point is a minimum.

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6 months ago

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