Anna C. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Physics tutor, A ...

Anna C.

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Degree: BEng Engineering Design with Study in Industry (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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About me

I'm currently in my final year of a Bachelors degree in Engineering Design, which is really interesting and covers subjects like:

- Failure of Materials (how stuff breaks)

- Thermofluids (for designing fighter jets and turbines through to understanding supernovas)

- Design Optimisation (to understand the design trade-offs between size, weight, cost and efficiency)

- Complex Systems Design (designing products to be useful, encourage health and wellbeing for the user and be environmentally friendly)

I'm a really keen tutor as I know school isn't always easy and if you don't have great teachers, subjects like Maths can be really hard to get your head around.

I've tutored students with a range of abilities and ages, from helping my little brother learn times tables to helping a friend learn differentiation for Economics at Oxford University.

Because of my design background, I like to explain things using diagrams and animations wherever possible (and I've got a lot of practice with design coursework and tight deadlines!). I know lots of ways of explaining difficult concepts and I've not yet failed to help a single person, so if you're looking for a tutor to really help you understand a subject, get your head round a piece of coursework or just someone to help you cram for an exam then hopefully I'll be able to help you out.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
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Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA
PhysicsA-LevelA
Graphic DesignA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

15/11/2013

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Ratings and reviews

5from 2 customer reviews

T (Parent) March 24 2015

Enjoyed lesson - useful tips.

Sam (Parent) February 16 2015

Great tutor - explaned the lesson in a simple manner so that what had originally seemed difficult became easy to understand - Thank you

Questions Anna has answered

What does differentiation actually mean?

When you differentiate an equation, you're finding the gradient of its graph. For example, if you differentiate the equation y = x2 you get a solution dy/dx = 2x This means that if you drew a line at a tangent to the curve of x2 at any point, and found the equation of that line in the form y ...

When you differentiate an equation, you're finding the gradient of its graph.

For example, if you differentiate the equation y = xyou get a solution dy/dx = 2x

This means that if you drew a line at a tangent to the curve of x2 at any point, and found the equation of that line in the form y = mx + c (where m is the gradient of the line, and c is the intercept) then the m value of that line would be 2x (with the x value at that point).

This makes sense; when y = 0 , the gradient of the curve is 0, and as x increases, y increases by 2x for every 1 that x increases by. Looking at the graph of x2, we can see that y does get bigger and increases more rapidly as x gets bigger; the slope or "differential" of the curve gets steeper.

But why is this useful?

Because the differential tells us the rate of change of x with y. It tells us how much y is changing as x changes, so it helps us to understand the relationship between x and y.

For example, imagine you're running a chemical reaction, with product "B". You want to make as much "B" as possible from your input "A". You know the relationship between A and B is given by B = 3A- 12A . 

Then you can find the differential dB/dA = 6A - 12 , which is positive so long as A is bigger than 2. As the differential is positive, then we know B is increasing, and we can see its increasing faster than A, as for every unit A increases, B increases by 6A-12. 

Therefore, you know that you want to make B in big batches, as you get more B out for every unit of A you put in. You also know that you definitely don’t want to make B with less than 2 units of A.

While this is a simple example, differentiation can be used on more complex equations in maths, physics, biology and chemistry to solve all kinds of problems.

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2 years ago

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