Emily  W. A Level Extended Project Qualification tutor, GCSE English ...

Emily W.

Currently unavailable: until 03/06/2016

Degree: Modern Languages and Cultures (Bachelors) - Durham University

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About me

Hi! I'm Emily, a languages student at Durham University looking forward to helping you with French, English or your EPQ. My experience as a tutor includes guiding my brother through his GCSEs, working as a mentor at school and leading musical workshops in local primary schools. Equally, my parents are teachers, so a passion for education runs in the family!

 

The Session:               

 

-Tailored to your learning style and needs.

 

-Divided into sections structured around your questions.

 

-Applying skills in exam-style situations

 

French: Tutoring in French, English or a mixture.

 

EPQ: Tutoring for those related to languages as well as answering general questions on the process.

 

English (GCSE):  Tutoring for comprehension, analytical and creative writing skills. Send me a 'WebMail' to find out if I can help you with specific texts. 

 

I hope to share my knowledge and love for languages so that you can gain confidence in your academic life. 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Extended Project Qualification A Level £20 /hr
French A Level £20 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
FrenchA-LevelA*
MusicA-LevelA
EPQA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: until

03/06/2016

Questions Emily has answered

How do I form the passé composé and when do I use it?

When do I use the passé composé?  The passé composé is used to describe a completed past action. If you imagine that you were looking at your watch for the duration of the action, and could therefore give a precise time for thestart and end of the event, the passé composé is the appropriate te...

When do I use the passé composé? 
The passé composé is used to describe a completed past action. If you imagine that you were looking at your watch for the duration of the action, and could therefore give a precise time for the start and end of the event, the passé composé is the appropriate tense to use. 

Some examples in English:
- He entered the office at 2pm.
- Yesterday, they went to the cinema together. 

How to form the passé composé:
You will need to know... 
1. The French Subject Pronouns: Je (I), Tu (you - singular), Il/Elle/On (he/she/one), Nous (we), Vous (you - plural/formal singular), Ils/Elles (they)
2. The auxiliary verbs avoir and être in the present tense: j'ai, tu as, il/elle/on a, nous avons, vous avez, ils/elles ont ; je suis, tu es, il/elle/on est, nous sommes, vous êtes, ils/elles sont. 
3. How to form the past participle of the verb in question and which auxiliary it requires:
- Regular ER verbs: remove 'er' from the infinitive (this is the "to" form of the verb that is found in the dictionary) and add 'é'. For example, 'manger' (to eat) becomes 'mangé'.
- Regular IR verbs: remove 'ir' from the infinitive and add 'i'. For example, 'choisir' (to choose) becomes 'choisi'.
- Regular RE verbs: remove 're' from the infinitive and add 'u'. For example, 'vendre' (to sell) becomes 'vendu.' 
- Unfortunately, there are many irregular verbs that need to be learned. You can find lists of the most common irregulars online, for example here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/french/grammar/verbsf/perftenseavoirrev2.shtml
4. The fact that verbs taking être can be remembered using the acrostic 'DR MRS VAN DER TRAMP.'
Devenir - Devenu - became
Revenir - Revenu - came back
Monter - Monté - went up
Rester - Resté - stayed
Sortir - Sorti - went out
Venir - Venu - came
Aller - Allé - went
Naitre - Né - was born
Descendre - Descendu - went down
Entrer - Entré - entered
Rentrer - Rentré - went back in
Tomber - Tombé - fell
Retourner - Retourné - returned
Arriver - Arrivé - arrived
Mourir - Mort - died
Partir - Parti - left
5. The fact that verbs taking être must agree in quantity and gender with the subject. 
- add 'e' to the past participle for feminine singular. 
- add 's' to the past participle for masculine plural. 
- add 'es' to the past participle for feminine plural. 

Examples of the passé composé:
- Ils sont allés au cinéma ensemble. 
- Elle est née hier. 

 

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2 years ago

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What are the four sentence moods and what do they signify?

Ultimately, you must not forget that the signification of all literary devices is dependent on their context. There is no standard connotation of any device.  1. The declarative sentence mood:  This mood occurs when a speaker makes a declaration or claim. It can be as simple as 'I will win the...

Ultimately, you must not forget that the signification of all literary devices is dependent on their context. There is no standard connotation of any device.  1. The declarative sentence mood:  This mood occurs when a speaker makes a declaration or claim. It can be as simple as 'I will win the competition.' The declarative mood is often linked to the creation of an assertive tone, which could demonstrate self-confidence, or even a self-centered nature.  2. The interrogative sentence mood:  Questions are always examples of the interrogative sentence mood and vice versa. For example: 'Who is he?' The interrogative sentence mood can create an atmosphere of uncertainty, demonstrating a lack of confidence from the speaker's perspective. Equally, the interrogative sentence mood can be viewed as a speaker's attempt to undermine their peers by challenging them or 'putting them on the spot.' Consequently, analysing the interplay between interrogative and declarative sentence moods is revealing of the power balance between speakers.  3. The imperative sentence mood: Expressing a desire or wish, demands and requests are examples of the imperative sentence mood. For example: 'Answer me now!' Depending on the context, imperatives can create an authoritarian tone or a frantic atmosphere, particularly if imperatives are in abundance or not followed by a response. Imperatives can be linked to hierarchy: a powerful character will use imperatives, a subordinate character will listen to imperatives.  4. The exclamatory sentence mood: Just like an exclamation mark, the exclamatory sentence mood describes a strong emotion.  

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2 years ago

566 views

What is the pluperfect tense and how is it formed?

Subject: French/A Level Q: How do I form the pluperfect and when do I use it?  A:  In French, the pluperfect tense is used to describe a completed event that has taken place before another event in the past. This is equivalent to the English 'had', for example:  Before he came to my house, ...

Subject: French/A Level

Q: How do I form the pluperfect and when do I use it? 

A: 

In French, the pluperfect tense is used to describe a completed event that has taken place before another event in the past. This is equivalent to the English 'had', for example: 

Before he came to my house, he had already eaten. 

You can remember the function of the pluperfect tense by thinking of its French title, plus-que-parfait, which literally translates as 'more than perfect.' Therefore, the title refers to the fact that this tense describes events that are 'more completed' as they occur before the perfect tense. 

In order to form the pluperfect tense, you will need to know: 
1. The French Subject Pronouns: Je, Tu, Il/Elle/On, Nous, Vous, Ils/Elles
2. The auxiliary verbs avoir and être in the imperfect tense: 
Avoir: j'avais, tu avais, il/elle/on avait, nous avions, vous aviez, ils/elles avaient
Être: j'étais, tu étais, il/elle/on était, nous étions, vous étiez, ils/elles étaient
3. The past participle of the verb in question (e.g. manger becomes mangé) and which auxiliary (avoir or être) it requires. 
4. The fact that verbs taking être and preceeding direct objects must agree with the subject in gender and quantity. For example: Elle était sortie avant qu'il n'est arrivé and Les maisons que j'avais achetées

Therefore, the formation of the pluperfect is very similar to that of the perfect. To decide which auxiliary a verb requires, you will need to distinguish between the verbs that take être, which can be remembered by the DR MRS VANDERTRAMP acrostic, and all other verbs which take aller. 
Devenir - Devenu
Revenir - Revenu 

Monter - Monté
Rester - Resté
Sortir - Sorti

Venir - Venu
Aller - Allé
Naitre - Né
Descendre - Descendu
Entrer - Entré
Rentrer - Rentré
Tomber - Tombé
Retourner - Retourné
Arriver - Arrivé
Mourir - Mort
Partir - Parti

Examples of the pluperfect: 
J'étais née avant...
Nous avions quittés la maison avant... 
Elles étaient montées...

 

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2 years ago

426 views
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