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Daniel S.

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Degree: Aerospace Engineering (Masters) - Bristol University

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About me

Hi, and thanks for viewing my resume!

 

My name is Daniel Stoops and I study Aerospace Engineering at the University of Bristol. I have achieved top grades throughout my school life and have recently been awarded the Dr Peter Spence Bursary Prize for being in the top five best performing students in my year (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/engineering/departments/aerospace/courses/projects/prizes.html).

 

The world we live in seems so simple, yet when describing the environment around us in Maths and Physics terms we start to encounter difficulties. So I'm here to ease students into the fascinating world of Maths and Physics by showing them how such tools are useful for everyday life: from pushing a box up a slope to race cars drifting round corners.

 

I have worked with children from ages three to 17 with social difficulties, special needs and from underprivileged backgrounds by being a counsellor at Camp America in the summers of 2013 and 2014 (CRB checked).

 

I look forward to meeting every tutee and parent and hope that I can make a positive impact on every child through the education of Maths and Physics.

 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths A Level £30 /hr
Physics A Level £30 /hr
Maths GCSE £30 /hr
Physics GCSE £30 /hr
Maths 13 Plus £30 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA*
PhysicsA-LevelA
EconomicsA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

29/05/2014

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Questions Daniel has answered

Convection, conduction and radiation in space

On Earth we notice convection through breathing, conduction through heat and radiation through sunlight. But do we notice these in space? And if not, then why? Let’s make a few definitions.   Convection is the spread of molecules in a fluid. This can be imagined as a blob of blue ink in wate...

On Earth we notice convection through breathing, conduction through heat and radiation through sunlight. But do we notice these in space? And if not, then why? Let’s make a few definitions.

 

Convection is the spread of molecules in a fluid. This can be imagined as a blob of blue ink in water. As the ink is placed in the water, it is spherical (ball shaped). But as time goes on the blue ink travels through the water, thus losing its sphericity.

 

Conduction is the transfer of heat from one substance to another by direct contact. For example, if you place a hot water bottle onto a blanket you will notice that after some time the blanket will feel warm. 

 

Radiation is energy transmitted in the form of waves, and does not require a medium to travel through (in comparison to sound that does require a medium - see below). An example of this is light, which is an electromagnetic wave and travels at the speed of light (3*10^8 m/s in a vacuum).

 

So why is this important in space? Let’s think about how sound travels: molecule one vibrates and crashes into molecule two, which makes molecule two vibrate and crash into molecule three and so on. Note that it is these molecules that make up a medium. However, in space there are no molecules and this is why sound cannot travel in space.

 

Therefore, in space we do not have convection as there is no fluid (a fluid is a gas or liquid) for the particles to travel through. But we can have radiation (for example, light) and conduction (for example, if you touch a hot water bottle in space you will feel its warmth).

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2 years ago

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Pushing a mass up a slope and energy

Please note: knowledge of the SUVAT equations, friction and trigonometry is required for this thread.   Energy comes in many forms, and here we will focus on kinetic energy (KE) and potential energy (PE). Below are the equations of KE and PE.   change in KE = 0.5*m*[v1^2 - v2^2] change in ...

Please note: knowledge of the SUVAT equations, friction and trigonometry is required for this thread.

 

Energy comes in many forms, and here we will focus on kinetic energy (KE) and potential energy (PE). Below are the equations of KE and PE.

 

change in KE = 0.5*m*[v1^2 - v2^2]

change in PE = m*g*[h2 - h1]

             where m = mass

             v1 = beginning velocity of mass

             v2 = final velocity of mass

             g = gravitational acceleration = 9.81 m/s^2

             h1 = beginning height of mass

             h2 = final height of mass

 

Here’s the scenario: a box is on a slope and is at rest (a velocity of 0 m/s). A man comes and pushes the box with constant force up the slope.

 

Let’s consider the energy of the box. Because the velocity of the box was originally 0 m/s and the man is now pushing it, which means it has some velocity because it is moving, the box’s KE has increased. Because the distance of the box from the ground has increased (the box is being pushed up the slope) the box’s PE has increased.

 

To find the change in KE, we will need to find the value of the beginning velocity, v1, and the value of the final velocity, v2, This can be done using the SUVAT equations and F=m*a, and I will be making a thread on these equations soon. In examples the mass will be constant and given, therefore we have everything we need to find the change in KE

 

To calculate PE we need the change in vertical distance of the box. This is complicated by the fact that the box is not moving in the vertical direction, but moving up a slope. Let us construct a right-angled triangle: one line being the ground (ground line), the line perpendicular (at 90 degrees) to the ground line being the change in vertical distance (vertical line) and the hypotenuse (longest line of the triangle) being the distance travelled by the mass (distance line). The angle between the slope and the ground will be the same angle the distance line makes with the ground line in our newly drawn triangle. We can calculate the distance travelled by the mass using the SUVAT equations, and thus find the length of the distance line. We can know complete our drawn triangle using trigonometry to find the length of the vertical line. The length of the vertical line is equal to the change in vertical height of the mass. Thus, we now have everything we need to find PE.

 

Some systems will ignore friction, perhaps because it is very small. Some systems will include friction because it is not small. Let’s say that friction is not a small term. We already know how to calculate the friction force from its equation: friction = coefficient of friction * reaction force. We also know that the work done (energy) of a body is: work done = force * distance. Substituting in the friction force to find the work done by the friction force we have: work done by friction force = coefficient of friction * reaction force * distance travelled. Thus we can now factor this into the system.

 

Remember the law of conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed, but can be transferred from one form (e.g. PE) to another (e.g. KE). Therefore, the changes in KE, PE and work done by friction must add up to be zero.

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2 years ago

501 views
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