PremiumSarah B. GCSE Biology tutor, A Level Biology tutor, Mentoring -Person...
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About me

Hello!

I am Sarah, a first year student at Bristol University, studying Graduate Entry Medicine.  Before this I studied Biomedical Sciences at Oxford University.  I have therefore gone through two rounds of UCAS applications and interviews and am keen to pass on all of the tips and tricks I learnt along the way. 

In the 'Meet the Tutor' 15 minute session I will make sure I know what you are aiming to take away from the tutorial, whether that is regular support, a focussed session of coaching for interviews and applications, or just one or two mock interviews.  I can also arrange feedback sessions on personal statements. During a tutorial I will explain fully the concepts with the aid of diagrams and the interactive whiteboard.  I will also suggest other material that you can refer back to for support after the tutorial is finished (e.g. youtube videos, online articles or websites).  

I have enjoyed tutoring for MyTutor for 4 years now as well as having experience tutoring in person.  I like to tailor the tutorials to each individual pupil so that they are pushed, but still find the learning fun by changing the format frequently, using diagrams and suggesting helpful tips to better remember key points.

I am generally available in the evenings of Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday.  However if you would prefer tutorials at other times then please contact me and I will be as flexible as I can be.

Best of luck!,

Sarah

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
-Medical School Preparation- Mentoring £30 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £30 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
BiologyA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelA*
MathsA-LevelA*
Further MathsA-LevelA*
Biomedical DegreeBachelors Degree2.i
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

20/10/2015

General Availability

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Ratings and reviews

4.9from 10 customer reviews

Mahesh (Parent) December 23 2015

Really helpful advice

Mahesh (Parent) December 6 2015

very helpful

Sean (Student) March 23 2013

very useful documents explanations and overall involving feel to the lesson, very useful for playback, thanks.

Bhavin (Student) February 24 2013

A very interesting lesson, we've covered biodiversity in a lot of detail and i've understood the topic very well. I enjoyed the lesson thank you very much
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Questions Sarah has answered

The enzyme maltase breaks down maltose to glucose. This takes place at body temperature. Explain why maltase: 1) only breaks down maltose 2) allows this reaction to take place at normal body temperature

The precise tertiary structure of maltose means it has an acitve site specific and complementary to maltose (lock and key analysis).  Once the substrate (maltose) has bound to the enzyme, maltase undergoes a conformational change that creates a better fit with the maltose molecule (induced fit...

The precise tertiary structure of maltose means it has an acitve site specific and complementary to maltose (lock and key analysis).  Once the substrate (maltose) has bound to the enzyme, maltase undergoes a conformational change that creates a better fit with the maltose molecule (induced fit model).  This produces an enzyme-substrate complex that stresses the bonds in maltose and provides an alternative pathway for the reaction to take place that requires less energy due to its lowered activation energy.  In this way maltase acts as a catalyst for the reaction, meaning it can take place at lower temperatures, including that of body temperature.

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1 year ago

4328 views

What factors would you consider when thinking about the spread of cancers throughout the body?

Many of the Oxbridge interview questions are not directly trying to test your knowledge, but instead your approach to tackling questions so explain your reasoning as you go through- it may even spark some more ideas! For example, you could start by saying the cancer cells could travel in the ...

Many of the Oxbridge interview questions are not directly trying to test your knowledge, but instead your approach to tackling questions so explain your reasoning as you go through- it may even spark some more ideas!

For example, you could start by saying the cancer cells could travel in the blood stream- therefore it would be a wise to study the circulatory system for the region of interest.  Similarly the lymph drainage of the area could direct the flow of cancer cells- lymph nodes could act like a net that collects the cells.

Then consider the reasons that might affect how likely the cells are to migrate- hormone changes, characteristics of the tissue it began growing in, drug interactions, changes to the immune system.

Finally you could consider the other areas of the body that may be most likely to facilitate cancer growth.  For example some tumours release chemicals that prepare other tissues to accept migrating cancer cells- if the chemical is known then it would be wise to look at tissue areas that have receptors for that chemical.

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1 year ago

274 views
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