Floss T. GCSE Spanish tutor

Floss T.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Spanish and Italian (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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About me

¡Hola!

I'm a first year student of Spanish and Italian at the University of Bristol. I love learning languages, and I believe anyone can ace their grades with a bit of enthusiasm and the right guidance!

I have experience in tutoring Spanish to a small group of Year 9 students, assisting in secondary school languages classes, tutoring English to Spanish adults, and teaching primary school children to read

 

Sessions with me

Languages are a great subject to teach because they can be made fun and dynamic. I have lots of ideas and resources to pass along (e.g. I love learning and teaching through songs) and I am able to explain things you are unsure of in lots of different ways, to make sure it's crystal clear.

Everyone learns in a different way. I like to gauge the kind of learner you are and tailor the sessions to you. I also like to use lots of examples to make sure you're able to use the skill we've discussed before we move on.

 

My aim is that by the end of a session you feel...

-comfortable and confident in issues you previously didn't understand

-as passionate about languages as me!

 

Please feel free to send me a Webmail or book a Meet the Tutor Session.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Spanish GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
SpanishA-LevelA
EnglishA-LevelA*
ArtA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Questions Floss has answered

How do I form and use the Perfect Tense?

The Perfect Tense was one of my favourite grade boosters at GCSE in speaking and writing because it's easy to make and easy to use.   The Perfect Tense is used to say you have done something: -Hemos ido al cinema juntos tres veces. (We have been to the cinema together three times) -¡Mi gato...

The Perfect Tense was one of my favourite grade boosters at GCSE in speaking and writing because it's easy to make and easy to use.

 

The Perfect Tense is used to say you have done something:

-Hemos ido al cinema juntos tres veces. (We have been to the cinema together three times)

-¡Mi gato ha comido un pájaro! (My cat has eaten a bird!)

-¿Qué has hecho hoy? (What have you done today?)

 

The Perfect Tense has two parts...

The present tense of the verb HABER + the PAST PARTICIPLE of a verb.

 

Conjugations of HABER:

(yo)                 He

(tú)                  Has

(él/ella/usted)  Ha

(nosotros)        Hemos

(vosotros)        Habéis

(ellos/ustedes) Han

This is the 'I have' part of the phrase 'I have done...'

 

Forming the past participle:

Simply take away the -ar, -er, or -ir from the infinitive verb and...

for -ar verbs, add -ado

for -er verbs, add -ido

for -ir verbs, add -ido

E.g. Hablar à Hablado, Comer à Comido, Vivir à Vivido

This is the 'done' part of the phrase 'I have done...'

It is like 'ed' words in English, for example 'walked', 'talked'. We have lots of irregulars in English like 'eaten', 'done', 'seen'.

NB: past participles are very useful to learn because they are also used in other structures and tenses.

 

Here are some common irregular past participles:

Hacer (to do) ~ Hecho

Decir (to say) ~ Dicho

Abrir (to open) ~ Abierto

Poner (to put) ~ Puesto

Ver (to see) ~ Visto

Volver (to return) ~ Vuelto

Escribir (to write) ~ Escrito

 

So, let's put them together in some examples.

I have eaten = He comido

You have seen = Has visto

He/she/it has said = Ha dicho

We have spoken = Hemos hablado

You (plural) have lived = Habéis vivido

They have written = Han escrito

 

And don't forget, the H is silent!

 

Let me know if you have any questions or need further explanations. I have practice worksheets on all the tenses.

¡Buena suerte!

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2 years ago

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How do I know if a noun is masculine or feminine?

A crash course in noun gender...   Spanish is very kind in that it's usually easy to work out whether a noun is masculine or feminine. If it ends in an O it is masculine. If it ends in an A it is feminine. E.g. Mundo (world), Trabajo (job), Perro (dog) are all masculine, and Casa  (house), ...

A crash course in noun gender...

 

Spanish is very kind in that it's usually easy to work out whether a noun is masculine or feminine.

If it ends in an it is masculine.

If it ends in an it is feminine.

E.g. Mundo (world), Trabajo (job), Perro (dog) are all masculine, and Casa (house), Palabra (word), Hora (hour) are all feminine.

 

We use the article El for a masculine noun, and La for a feminine noun. (this is why, when you learn a new noun, you should always write the article next to it - e.g. write 'la casa' not just 'casa'.)

 

If a word ends in another letter, for example Mujer (woman) or País (country), it could be either.

There are lots of patterns to look out for - e.g. nouns ending in 'ión' like Opinión (opinion) and Construcción (building/construction) tend to be feminine.

Sometimes you can work out whether it's masculine or feminine from what it is e.g. Hombre (man) is a masculine noun.

Here are a few examples:

Questión (question) = feminine

Madre (mother) = feminine

Ciudad (city) = feminine

Aire (air) = masculine

Arte (art) = masculine

País (country) = masculine

 

There are, of course, some irregulars, where the noun ends in an O but is feminine, or ends in an A but is masculine:

La mano (hand) = feminine

El programa (programme) = masculine

El día (day) = masculine

El problema (problem) = Masculine

 

Some nouns can take either an O or an A at the end to mean either, for example Niño (child) can be Niño for a boy or Niña for a girl.

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2 years ago

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What is adjectival agreement?

Adjectival agreement means that the adjective 'agrees' with the noun it's describing ingender and number.   Number This is nice and simple in Spanish. If you have more than one of something, put an S on the end of the adjective, as well as the noun. For example: El gato negro. (The black c...

Adjectival agreement means that the adjective 'agrees' with the noun it's describing in gender and number.

 

Number

This is nice and simple in Spanish. If you have more than one of something, put an S on the end of the adjective, as well as the noun.

For example:

El gato negro. (The black cat.)

Los gatos negros. (The black cats.)

 

Gender

Spanish nouns are either masculine or feminine*. The adjective must agree with the gender of the noun.

In most cases, end the adjective with an O for masculine, and an A for feminine. 

E.g.

El gato negro. (The black cat.)

La casa negra. (The black house.)

 

Some adjectives stay the same whether they are describing a masculine or a feminine noun. These adjectives usually end in E.

E.g. Grande (big), Verde (green).

They must still agree in number.

E.g.

Las casas verdes. (The green houses.)

Los gatos grandes. (The big cats.)

 

Don't forget, the noun generally comes before the adjective.

 

*See my explanation for masculine and feminine nouns.

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2 years ago

373 views
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