Dominic S. A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Biology tutor

Dominic S.

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Neuroscience (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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Message Dominic

About me

My name is Dominic Steele and I am passionate about teaching biology GCSE and A-Level. I am currently studying Neuroscience at the University of Bristol and am predicted a high 1:1. Once I have finished my studies I hope to go into teaching full time. I believe that teaching should be interactive and fun and never a one way dialogue. This is your chance to make sure that you get the grade that you deserve!

My name is Dominic Steele and I am passionate about teaching biology GCSE and A-Level. I am currently studying Neuroscience at the University of Bristol and am predicted a high 1:1. Once I have finished my studies I hope to go into teaching full time. I believe that teaching should be interactive and fun and never a one way dialogue. This is your chance to make sure that you get the grade that you deserve!

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01/07/2009

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
PoliticsA-level (A2)A*
BiologyA-level (A2)A
EconomicsA-level (A2)A
ChemistryA-level (A2)A

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyA Level£20 /hr
BiologyGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Dominic has answered

Explain how the eye responds to different light levels.

Light is a sensory stimulus detected by the eye. Rods and cones located in the retina of the eye respond to light. The pupillary reflex is responsible for controlling the amount of light hitting the retina. In bright light, circular muscles contract and radial muscles relax to make the pupil smaller. In dim light the opposite occurs, circular muscles relax and radial muscles contract in order to make the pupil wider and allow more light into the eye. 

Light is a sensory stimulus detected by the eye. Rods and cones located in the retina of the eye respond to light. The pupillary reflex is responsible for controlling the amount of light hitting the retina. In bright light, circular muscles contract and radial muscles relax to make the pupil smaller. In dim light the opposite occurs, circular muscles relax and radial muscles contract in order to make the pupil wider and allow more light into the eye. 

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3 years ago

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