Adam O. GCSE Maths tutor, GCSE Physics tutor, A Level Maths tutor, A ...

Adam O.

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Degree: Physics (Masters) - Oxford, St Hugh's College University

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About me

About me:

Hi! I'm Adam, I'm 19 and I'm a 2nd year physics undergraduate at Oxford University.

I love teaching physics and maths - giving people that 'click' moment when it all fits and makes sense. 

I have helped people of all ages, as young as 3 (when they can hardly even speak!), so I am used to adapting to individual needs and finding the right approach for the student.

My main traits which make me a good tutor are my patienceapproachability and calm nature. I also have a strong ability to ask the right questions to find why a student doesn't understand a problem.

 

The sessions

Our tutorials will be focussed - we will target the student's weakest areas to improve their grades.

I will approach the problem from the beginning, ensuring the student has a strong understanding of the basic ideas before attempting harder problems, as this is crucial for remembering the techniques - it's hard to forget something when it seems common sense!

Most importantly I will keep the tutorials engaging and fun - concentrating on study is so much easier when you're enjoying it!

 

If you would like me to be your tutor don't hesitate to get in touch!

 

 

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Extra information regarding qualifications

For A Level maths I did 2.5 A Levels (called Maths, Further Maths, and Additional Further Maths), totalling 15 modules, with OCR MEI. I did the following modules:

Core C1 C2 C3 C4

Further Pure FP1 FP2 FP3

Mechanics M1 M2 M3 M4

Statistics S1 S2 S3

Differential Equations DE

 

Between GCSE and A Level I did the Additional Maths FSMQ with OCR MEI also, and would be happy to help with anyone studying for this.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Further Mathematics A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA*
Further MathsA-LevelA*
PhysicsA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelA
Additional Further Maths (AS)A-LevelA
PAT (Physics Aptitude Test)Uni Admissions Test-
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable:

Questions Adam has answered

What does the double slit experiment tell us about light?

Imagine an opaque barrier (no light can get through) with two parallel slits in it, onto which we shine a coherent light source (light of only one wavelength and in phase - a laser, for example, can produce this). There is a screen behind the barrier and slits.   What will the pattern on the...

Imagine an opaque barrier (no light can get through) with two parallel slits in it, onto which we shine a coherent light source (light of only one wavelength and in phase - a laser, for example, can produce this). There is a screen behind the barrier and slits.

 

What will the pattern on the screen look like?

 

If light was made up of tiny particles, like spraying tiny pellets towards the slits, we would expect that the particles which went towards a slit would fly straight through and land on the screen, forming two bright lines on the screen - one behind each slit. The photoelectric effect tells us that light acts with a particle nature, so this is what we should expect.

 

However this is not what we see with light!

 

With light, the pattern that emerges on the screen is a series of bright and dark bands, alternating across the screen (not just two bright bands). This is known as an interference pattern. This pattern is exactly what we would see if we had passed a water wave through the slits - strips where the wave was high and strips where the water was still. This results from the interference of waves.

This demonstrates that light has a wavelike nature, which seems to be contrary to what the photoelectric effect demonstrated. 

 

So which one is wrong?

 

Neither!

 

Amazingly, light sometimes acts like a wave and sometimes like particles - sometimes we have to think of it like waves to explain what happens and sometimes we have to think of it as made of particles.

 

This unusual property is called the wave-particle duality of light.

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2 years ago

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