Ellen J.

Ellen J.

£20 - £22 /hr

Classics (Latin & Ancient Greek) (Bachelors) - Kings, London University

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68 completed lessons

About me

Currently studying a BA in Classics (Latin & Ancient Greek) at Kings College London, I recently left Sixth Form as the highest performing student in my year. Largely, I put this down to the passion I had for my subjects - I always wanted to learn more and this in turn enabled me to acquire greater knowlege and improve my grades.

Initially, I began tutoring my peers whilst we were studying for our GCSEs because I recognised that sometimes an individual's needs were not being met in a classroom setting. By identifying their strengths and talents and using them to their advantage, I was able to help them boost their grades and enjoy learning. During my A-Levels, I continued to tutor younger students to succeed, particularly by helping them to find areas they enjoyed or were interested in when motivation was sometimes lacking.

Of course, it is not just learning by rote or making mind-maps that ensures good results and I am also able to help students to prepare more generally for exams. Personally, ensuring I had a planned routine, ate well and allowed for rest and relaxation also helped be to achieve top grades, as it meant I was not frazzled or overwrought, even when taking twenty-four exams across three weeks.

Currently studying a BA in Classics (Latin & Ancient Greek) at Kings College London, I recently left Sixth Form as the highest performing student in my year. Largely, I put this down to the passion I had for my subjects - I always wanted to learn more and this in turn enabled me to acquire greater knowlege and improve my grades.

Initially, I began tutoring my peers whilst we were studying for our GCSEs because I recognised that sometimes an individual's needs were not being met in a classroom setting. By identifying their strengths and talents and using them to their advantage, I was able to help them boost their grades and enjoy learning. During my A-Levels, I continued to tutor younger students to succeed, particularly by helping them to find areas they enjoyed or were interested in when motivation was sometimes lacking.

Of course, it is not just learning by rote or making mind-maps that ensures good results and I am also able to help students to prepare more generally for exams. Personally, ensuring I had a planned routine, ate well and allowed for rest and relaxation also helped be to achieve top grades, as it meant I was not frazzled or overwrought, even when taking twenty-four exams across three weeks.

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About my sessions

Outlining my goals for the lesson is paramount. Drafting an outline of how our time together ought to be structured is one of the first things we will do - going over topics, skills and any particular areas of concern the student might have. Approaching each topic in a methodical way helps students to learn best, in my experience and I often use a 'scaffolding' technique - building up the information, ensuring the basics are solid before we move on to the more complicated aspects. Encouraging the pupil to ask questions is also important, but even more important is taking the time to listen to their concerns, questions or comments. Whereas traditional teaching often relies upon the teacher speaking, I like to take a more interactive approach which truly engages the student and keeps them fully attentive. One area I am also particularly strong in is identifying when perhaps a student might not be as confident in an area as they seem - after all, I've done it myself - and I like to make sure that this doesn't go unidentified or uncorrected. Most importantly, howevever, I think learning should be interesting because when you are invested in a subject, you are far more inclined to work hard and subsequently achieve.

Outlining my goals for the lesson is paramount. Drafting an outline of how our time together ought to be structured is one of the first things we will do - going over topics, skills and any particular areas of concern the student might have. Approaching each topic in a methodical way helps students to learn best, in my experience and I often use a 'scaffolding' technique - building up the information, ensuring the basics are solid before we move on to the more complicated aspects. Encouraging the pupil to ask questions is also important, but even more important is taking the time to listen to their concerns, questions or comments. Whereas traditional teaching often relies upon the teacher speaking, I like to take a more interactive approach which truly engages the student and keeps them fully attentive. One area I am also particularly strong in is identifying when perhaps a student might not be as confident in an area as they seem - after all, I've done it myself - and I like to make sure that this doesn't go unidentified or uncorrected. Most importantly, howevever, I think learning should be interesting because when you are invested in a subject, you are far more inclined to work hard and subsequently achieve.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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09/04/2018

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A*
Classical CivilisationA-level (A2)A*
Global Perspectives & Research (Pre-U)A-level (A2)A*
LatinA-level (A2)B
History A-level (AS)A

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Classical CivilisationA Level£22 /hr
Classical CivilisationGCSE£20 /hr
English LanguageGCSE£20 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£20 /hr
Latin13 Plus£20 /hr

Questions Ellen has answered

Explain How Horace Conveys The Benefits Of Augustus' Reign in his Odes 4.15

It's important students recognise that marks will be awarded both for identifying specific details and then for their explanations. Ideally students should identify at least five quotations from the text and explore their broader meaning in relation to the benefits of Augustus' reign. Aspects within the poem they could explore include: the link to prosperity ('rich crops'); the improved safety for Roman people, as evidenced by the references to the loss of 'crime' or the 'tightened the reign on lawlessness'; the safety from Civil War ('no civil disturbance' and 'no mutual enemies of wretched towns) which was important given the wars present at the fall of the Republic; the superiority over other peoples ('fame and majesty of our empire' and the return of the 'Parthian pillars' (references may be may made to this signficiance of this as highlighted on the Prima Porta); the fact the benefits came from Augustus himself - 'Caesar, this age has restored' 'freed at last' and 'driven out crime' - everything Horace describes is directly as a result the success of Augustus himself.  It's important students recognise that marks will be awarded both for identifying specific details and then for their explanations. Ideally students should identify at least five quotations from the text and explore their broader meaning in relation to the benefits of Augustus' reign. Aspects within the poem they could explore include: the link to prosperity ('rich crops'); the improved safety for Roman people, as evidenced by the references to the loss of 'crime' or the 'tightened the reign on lawlessness'; the safety from Civil War ('no civil disturbance' and 'no mutual enemies of wretched towns) which was important given the wars present at the fall of the Republic; the superiority over other peoples ('fame and majesty of our empire' and the return of the 'Parthian pillars' (references may be may made to this signficiance of this as highlighted on the Prima Porta); the fact the benefits came from Augustus himself - 'Caesar, this age has restored' 'freed at last' and 'driven out crime' - everything Horace describes is directly as a result the success of Augustus himself. 

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12 months ago

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