Hugh R. GCSE Maths tutor, GCSE Chemistry tutor, GCSE Biology tutor, G...

Hugh R.

Unavailable

Medicine (Bachelors) - Newcastle University

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About me

About me:

Hi! My name’s Hugh and I’m 23 years old. I am in my 4th year studying medicine at Newcastle University.

At school I developed a passion for science which has stayed with me into universityI enjoy teaching and have experience tutoring GCSE maths and science to students preparing for their exams.

The sessions

GCSE science and maths requires you to understand some difficult concepts, but I believe that even the most complex ideas can be explained in a simple way by a good teacher.

Sitting in a classroom learning from the whiteboard is not how most of us learn best. I find it useful to use many different ways (e.g. diagrams, analogies, examples) to explain a concept, and I like to keep my sessions as interactive as possible.

To ensure that you get the most out of our time together, you will guide what we cover during each session.

What’s next?

If you would like to meet me prior to booking any tutoring, please feel free to book a 15 minute ‘meet the tutor’ session where I can answer any questions you may have.

Thanks for your interest and I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Hugh

About me:

Hi! My name’s Hugh and I’m 23 years old. I am in my 4th year studying medicine at Newcastle University.

At school I developed a passion for science which has stayed with me into universityI enjoy teaching and have experience tutoring GCSE maths and science to students preparing for their exams.

The sessions

GCSE science and maths requires you to understand some difficult concepts, but I believe that even the most complex ideas can be explained in a simple way by a good teacher.

Sitting in a classroom learning from the whiteboard is not how most of us learn best. I find it useful to use many different ways (e.g. diagrams, analogies, examples) to explain a concept, and I like to keep my sessions as interactive as possible.

To ensure that you get the most out of our time together, you will guide what we cover during each session.

What’s next?

If you would like to meet me prior to booking any tutoring, please feel free to book a 15 minute ‘meet the tutor’ session where I can answer any questions you may have.

Thanks for your interest and I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Hugh

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Enhanced DBS Check

11/11/2014

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
PhysicsA-level (A2)A
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
BiologyA-level (A2)A

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyGCSE£18 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£18 /hr
ScienceGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Hugh has answered

What is the oxygen-haemoglobin dissociation curve?

The oxygen-haemoglobin dissociation curve is a graph that compares the % of haemoglobin saturated with oxygen on the y-axis to the partial pressure of oxygen in the blood on the x-axis (mmHg). It is a useful tool for understanding how oxygen is transported to the tissues of the body from the lungs.

In areas where the partial pressure of oxygen in the blood is high (i.e. in the capillaries of the lungs), almost all of the haemoglobin will become saturated with oxygen. In areas where the partial pressure of oxygen is low (i.e. in the capillaries supplying the tissues of the body), the haemoglobin will release it’s oxygen and thereby supply the cells of the tissue with oxygen for respiration.

Haemoglobin’s affinity for oxygen (i.e. the strength with which oxygen binds to haemoglobin) and hence the position of the curve is affected by physiological factors.

If the curve shifts to the right it means that the haemoglobin has decreased affinity for oxygen. In general, factors that decrease haemoglobin’s oxygen affinity are those physiological states where body tissues require more oxygen e.g. during exercise. While exercising, temperature, carbon dioxide levels and lactic acid levels increase and all these changes cause right shift.

Left shift occurs under opposite conditions to right shift, and is where the haemoglobin has increased affinity for oxygen and won’t release it as readily.

Here is a table showing the effects on the curve caused by changes in several physiological factors:

Factor

Increase

Decrease

Temperature

Right shift

Left shift

PaCO2

Right shift

Left shift

pH

Left shift

Right shift

 

The oxygen-haemoglobin dissociation curve is a graph that compares the % of haemoglobin saturated with oxygen on the y-axis to the partial pressure of oxygen in the blood on the x-axis (mmHg). It is a useful tool for understanding how oxygen is transported to the tissues of the body from the lungs.

In areas where the partial pressure of oxygen in the blood is high (i.e. in the capillaries of the lungs), almost all of the haemoglobin will become saturated with oxygen. In areas where the partial pressure of oxygen is low (i.e. in the capillaries supplying the tissues of the body), the haemoglobin will release it’s oxygen and thereby supply the cells of the tissue with oxygen for respiration.

Haemoglobin’s affinity for oxygen (i.e. the strength with which oxygen binds to haemoglobin) and hence the position of the curve is affected by physiological factors.

If the curve shifts to the right it means that the haemoglobin has decreased affinity for oxygen. In general, factors that decrease haemoglobin’s oxygen affinity are those physiological states where body tissues require more oxygen e.g. during exercise. While exercising, temperature, carbon dioxide levels and lactic acid levels increase and all these changes cause right shift.

Left shift occurs under opposite conditions to right shift, and is where the haemoglobin has increased affinity for oxygen and won’t release it as readily.

Here is a table showing the effects on the curve caused by changes in several physiological factors:

Factor

Increase

Decrease

Temperature

Right shift

Left shift

PaCO2

Right shift

Left shift

pH

Left shift

Right shift

 

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3 years ago

8884 views

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