Olivia P. GCSE Biology tutor, A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Chemistry t...

Olivia P.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Biochemistry (Bachelors) - Exeter University

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About me

Hi, I am currently a Biochemistry undergraduate at the University of Exeter and am eager to help both GCSE and A level students with any problems they are having in Biology, Chemistry and Maths

I have tutored before in all of these subjects, both at home for my younger sister and her friends and at school at the request of my A level Chemistry teacher. I really enjoyed these experiences and so want to continue helping younger students where I can. 

During a session with me I will help to answer and explain any questions you have and will dedicate my time until you fully understand the topic. I will try and keep the session engaging through the use of video clips and drawings that I found useful when I studied these subjects myself. If you were to ask me something I did not know the answer to I would do my research and make sure I did not leave you without an answer.

I achieved an A* in Biology, Chemistry, Maths and Further Maths at GCSE and in Biology and Chemistry at A level and also an A in Maths A level. 

 

Thank you for reading and I hope you will consider me to be your tutor. 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £20 /hr
Chemistry A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Science GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathematicsA-LevelA
ChemistryA-LevelA*
BiologyA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Questions Olivia has answered

How do you find the mean of 5 values?

As a general rule of thumb, to find the mean of a given set of numbers: add up all the numbers youve been given and divide by the number of values you have. e.g. Find the mean of these values: 5, 10, 8, 9, 20. so add them up:  5+10+8+9+20 = 52 and divide by the number of values : 52/5 = 10....

As a general rule of thumb, to find the mean of a given set of numbers:

add up all the numbers youve been given and divide by the number of values you have.

e.g.

Find the mean of these values: 5, 10, 8, 9, 20.

so add them up:  5+10+8+9+20 = 52

and divide by the number of values : 52/5 = 10.4

if your mean value has to be one of the given values and not somewhere inbetween then round to the nearest, here it would be 10.

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2 years ago

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What are the different stages of mitosis?

Mitosis is a type of cell division that results in genetically identical daughter cells and occurrs in many parts of the body helping with repair and replacement of cells. It is also used in asexual reproduction. These are the stages of mitosis: Interphase - this is technically all cell stage...

Mitosis is a type of cell division that results in genetically identical daughter cells and occurrs in many parts of the body helping with repair and replacement of cells. It is also used in asexual reproduction.

These are the stages of mitosis:

Interphase - this is technically all cell stages that aren't a part of mitosis.

Prophase - is the first stage. Here the individual chromosomes (which have already replicated their DNA) condense and become distinguishable from one another.

Metaphase - is when the chromosomes line up at the equator(middle) of the cell and the spindle fibres form and attach to the centromeres of the chromosomes.

Anaphase - here the sister chromatids are pulled apart as the spindle fibres shorten back to the poles of the cell.

Telophase - this stage involves the reformation of a nuclear envelope around each set of chromatids(now chromosomes). The chromosomes unravel and are no longer individually visible. A cleavage furrow forms and results in cytokinesis, separating the two daughter cells.

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2 years ago

375 views

What are the different types of epistasis?

Epistasis occurrs when one allele of a gene masks the expression of alleles of another gene. When there is no epistasis a dihybrid cross (two characteristics) of two heterozygote individuals(each individual has one of each allele) results in a phenotypic ratio or9:3:3:1 (both dominant:first d...

Epistasis occurrs when one allele of a gene masks the expression of alleles of another gene.

When there is no epistasis a dihybrid cross (two characteristics) of two heterozygote individuals(each individual has one of each allele) results in a phenotypic ratio or 9:3:3:1 (both dominant:first dominant, second recessive:second dominant, first recessive:both recessive).

here are the different types:

1. Recessive epistasis, i.e. the epistatic allele is recessive so for it to mask the other gene two copies are needed. To illustrate this carry out a dihybrid cross with a homozygous dominant individual and a homozygous recessive individual and you will see a ratio of 9:3:4 (dominant both: dominant epistatic, recessive other:recessive epistatic).

 

2. Dominant epistasis, i.e. the epistatic allele is dominant so only one copy is needed to mask the other gene. If you carry out the same cross as for recessive you will see a ratio of 12:3:1 (dominant epistatic: recessive epistatic, dominant other: recessive both).

 

3. Complementary epistasis, i.e. the genes work together in a complementary fashion so you need at least one dominant allele of both genes to get one phenotype and all other combinations give another phenotype. The ratio you get is 9:7 (dominant both: recessive either or both). 

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2 years ago

3308 views
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