Jordan H. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Physics tutor, ...
£20 - £22 /hr

Jordan H.

Degree: MPhys Physics with Professional Experience (Masters) - Exeter University

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About me

A bit about me:

I'm a Physics student (MPhys - 4 years) currently achieving a first at the University of Exeter. I have always thoroughly enjoyed Maths and since a trip in year 1 to a place called Techniquest I have been fascinated by all things scientific. Hopefully I will help you to love it as much as I do!

For both my GCSEs and A-levels I had a group of friends that all had strengths in different subjects and so we would all help to tutor each other - this means I know how it feels to be both the tutor and tutee, which definitely helps me to enable the student to understand the topics and explain them in a new way.

Tutorials:

These are going to be on the topics you wish to cover. The difficulty with science and maths is that just memorising the subject doesn't help you, instead you need to understand the concepts and methods, then be able to apply them. In the sessions I will make sure you gain understanding of the topic, then we can work through problems to make you confident enough to tackle anything the exam board will throw at you.

I will use as many different ways to explain something as I can as I know different things work for different people. Both Physics and Maths can be interesting and fun to learn about, which makes the whole process a lot easier so hopefully you will begin to enjoy the work.

So, what now? 

If you have any questions, please feel free to send me a webmail or book a meet the tutor session (you can do both of these on this website). Let me know what exam board you're on and which areas you're struggling with so I can prepare some questions and past papers for you. 

Thank you, and I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths A Level £22 /hr
Physics A Level £22 /hr
Biology GCSE £20 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £20 /hr
Physics GCSE £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathematicsA-LevelA*
PhysicsA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelA
BiologyA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

General Availability

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Ratings and reviews

5from 15 customer reviews

Umar (Student) November 27 2016

Explained everything perfectly

Emma (Student) January 22 2016

He made things easier to understand as he went through the topic step by step. It was a good first session :)

Julie (Parent) September 7 2015

excellent

Julie (Parent) August 14 2015

Excellent tutor.
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Questions Jordan has answered

How do control rods work in a nuclear fission reactor?

In Nuclear Fission, neutrons collide with radioactive atoms (eg Uranium-235) in order to split the atom into two smaller atoms and releasing energy. The more neutrons there are the faster the reaction so to slow it down you need to remove the neutrons. This is done using control rods which ab...

In Nuclear Fission, neutrons collide with radioactive atoms (eg Uranium-235) in order to split the atom into two smaller atoms and releasing energy. The more neutrons there are the faster the reaction so to slow it down you need to remove the neutrons.

This is done using control rods which absorb excess neutrons (reactions require 1 neutron and release 3 so there quickly becomes too many neutrons). They are composed of a material which has many stable isotopes (like Boron) so when the atoms absorb a neutron, they still don't become radioactive. If the reaction is going too fast, the control rods are lowered into the reactor, this increases their surace area to absorb neutrons. If the reaction is going too fast they are rasied up so less neutrons are absorbed.

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2 years ago

358 views

Why does a single slit diffraction pattern occur?

When light passes through a narrow gap it will diffract (spread out). This means the light reaching the screen could have come from anywhere within the slit. If one wavefront passes through the left of the slit and another through the right, when they meet they will have travelled slightly dif...

When light passes through a narrow gap it will diffract (spread out). This means the light reaching the screen could have come from anywhere within the slit. If one wavefront passes through the left of the slit and another through the right, when they meet they will have travelled slightly different distances - these distances are called the path length and the difference between them is the path difference. 

 

As the waves meet, they will interfere (their displacements add together). If the wavefronts are no longer alligned due to the path difference, the waves can begin to cancel out casing dark spots to appear. No light appears on the screen when the two waves meeting are antiphase (peak meets a trough) as the dispacements always sum to zero. This occurs when the path difference is a half-integer number of wavelengths. A bright spot appears when the waves are in phase and the paths difference is equal to an integer multiple of wavelengths.

 

For dark fringes:

a*sin(θ= nλ      (is the width of the slit. λ is the wavelenth of the light. n is any integer)

A little note: monochromatic (light of a single wavelengh) is used to make the dark and bright spots clear to see. Look at the equation and think about why light of many colours would make this difficult.

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2 years ago

344 views
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