Maia  H. GCSE German tutor, A Level Japanese tutor, GCSE English Lang...

Maia H.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Japanese and Linguistics (Bachelors) - Edinburgh University

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About me

About Me:

Hi there! I've always had an affinity and passion for languages and literature and am keen to help others grow more confident in their own skills. I'm half Japanese and have lived in Germany for the past 6 years, so my language skills are very much up to scratch, and I have a lot of vocab/grammar/exam techniques and tips up my sleeve! Patient, friendly and committed, I am able to guide students towards the highest possible marks for IB/A-Level and GCSE.

The Tutorials

Through my own experience, I am aware that languages are often taught in a way that can be overwhelming or confusing - all very abstract, and a lot of memorising! For my tutorials, I like to keep things relaxed but focussed on exactly what you need and/or find interesting. We'll make sure to cover the exact syllabus as well, so you're hitting all the nails on the head for your exam, but ultimately, you decide what we cover! The aim is to get to the point where you're confident in all four aspects of the language (reading/writing/listening/speaking) - or for English Lit/Lang, you can comfortably tackle any old text they throw at you!

For those thinking of applying to do a language/linguistics at university, I can also help with personal statements

Some experience...

I received A*'s at GCSE for French, German, Japanese, English Language, and English Literature; A's at A-Level for German and Japanese, and was in the top 0.9% of IB grades worldwide for my year, including a 7 in HL German. --- I've also tutored all these subjects! :)

Don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions, or book a Meet the Tutor Session with me - looking forward to working with you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
German A Level £20 /hr
Japanese A Level £20 /hr
English Language GCSE £18 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
German GCSE £18 /hr
Japanese GCSE £18 /hr
German IB £20 /hr
Japanese IB £20 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
JapaneseA-LevelA
GermanA-LevelA
HL German Baccalaureate7
HL English LiteratureBaccalaureate7
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Ratings and reviews

5from 22 customer reviews

Kam (Parent) July 28 2015

Maia -Technical aspects of the German language covered.

Kam (Parent) July 29 2015

As always a focused, well delivered and friendly tutorial

Kam (Parent) July 27 2015

Another clear and concise tutorial

Kam (Parent) July 23 2015

Another highly beneficial tutorial.
See all reviews

Questions Maia has answered

How do I ask questions in German? (simple, no question-words)

When you want to ask a question that does not use the question-words: who, what, when, where, why, how (wer, was, wann, wo, warum, wie) - you simply swap make the main verb the first part of the sentence (the same as in English!). -- remember the main verb is in the second position in German. ...

When you want to ask a question that does not use the question-words: who, what, when, where, why, how (wer, was, wann, wo, warum, wie) - you simply swap make the main verb the first part of the sentence (the same as in English!). -- remember the main verb is in the second position in German.

For example:

Der Hund ist im Haus. (The dog is in the house.)

Ist der Hund im Haus? (Is the dog in the house?)

The same applies to everything - even much more complex sentences! Simply drag out the main verb.

Er hat seiner Oma einen Brief geschrieben. (He wrote his grandmother a letter.)

Hat er seiner Oma einen Brief geschrieben? (Did he write his grandmother a letter?)

-- remember for this example, 'geschrieben' may look like a verb, but it is only the second part of the perfect tense arrangement. Only drag out the MAIN verb - the verb that directly corresponds to the subject of the sentence (in this case 'he').

 

 

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2 years ago

328 views

How do I change the dictionary form into na-adjective format?

The na-adjective is very easy to conjugate - simply stick 'na' onto the end of the dictionary form of the adjective.  It very simply modifies the noun that comes after it.  For example: kirei (pretty), ki (tree) --> kireinaki (pretty tree) shizuka (quiet), heya (room) --> shizukanaheya (quie...

The na-adjective is very easy to conjugate - simply stick 'na' onto the end of the dictionary form of the adjective. 

It very simply modifies the noun that comes after it. 

For example:

kirei (pretty), ki (tree) --> kireinaki (pretty tree)

shizuka (quiet), heya (room) --> shizukanaheya (quiet room)

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2 years ago

326 views

What's the best way for me to structure an essay based on an excerpt in a text I have studied?

One really easy acronym to remember is SMILE - Structure, Meaning, Imagery, Language, Effect. An essay that incorporates an analysis of all of those features will get the marks you need. The order is not fixed, just so you remember to include them. 'Structure' could include repetition, any mir...

One really easy acronym to remember is SMILE - Structure, Meaning, Imagery, Language, Effect. An essay that incorporates an analysis of all of those features will get the marks you need. The order is not fixed, just so you remember to include them. 'Structure' could include repetition, any mirroring, foreshadowing, parallels in other parts of the text (you don't have to stick to the excerpt, you can briefly refere outside of it);  'Meaning' is basically any big themes or meanings the author is trying to convey (e.g. the "American Dream can never be fully realised") - remember the text is a means through which the author is trying to convey something; 'Imagery' includes metaphors, similes, descriptive language, collections of adjectives or pre-modifiers - remember you also have to explain what all this imagery is trying to do - add to the meaning? enhance the setting?; 'Language' - anything else in particular you notice in the text? other literary techniques? figurative language, emotive language, think lexical fields (e.g. 'celestial/terrestrial/floral'/etc; 'the lexical field of machinery'); 'Effect' is extremely important as well - what does the language/structure/etc chosen make the reader/audience feel? Is the narrative reliable/questionable? And why? It's good to include the Meaning/Effect of each feature you pick up on immediately after you analyse it to keep your discussion tight and focussed on the question. After every paragraph, always refer directly back to your original question.

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2 years ago

484 views
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