Rocio F. GCSE Maths tutor

Rocio F.

Currently unavailable: no new students

Degree: Economics (Bachelors) - Warwick University

MyTutor guarantee

Contact Rocio
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Rocio

About me

About me:

Hi! My name is Rocio and I am studying Economics at the University of Warwick. I would love to be able to help you to achieve those high grades in GCSE mathematics as I have recent and extensive experience in the subject, having achieved top marks at GCSE and A Level, and having half of my degree being made up of mathematical modules. I have tutored my little cousins regularly in mathematics as I am very passionate about the subject and love to teach it! I am extremely friendly and approachable, so you can ask me any questions you want (seriously any... even if it was one you were too afraid to ask in class because you thought it was silly), but I am also extremely dedicated, so I will work hard to make sure you achieve your desired result.

The Sessions:

My method of tutoring is very clear and structured, while being specific to your individual needs. 

If you are having difficulty with a particular topic, I will aim to go through it throughly, breaking down complicated concepts into very simple step-by-step processes, and using examples to reinforce your understanding. It's important to build a good foundation, so that you have a good understanding, and can then answer any question on the topic, rather than just memorising a formula you don't understand.

I am extremely patient - so do not worry if you still don't get it at first! I can go over a topic as many times as is necessary, and will use alternative methods of explaining it each time until you understand.

We can then go through questions together, at whatever pace suits you, and once you are confident we can try past paper examination questions on the topic to make sure you are fully prepared and get the best result in your upcoming exams! Equally, if you just want help on exam technique or specific questions you found difficult in class, then that's all fine too! It's about what ever you want!

 

Hope to speak with you soon :)
 

 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA*
Further MathsA-LevelA
EconomicsA-LevelA
PhysicsA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

17/03/2015

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: no new students

Questions Rocio has answered

What is compound interest and how do I calculate it?

Compound interest means, for example, the money you have put into a bank, earns interest each year, but you earn interest upon the interest that was already added last year i.e. you earn interest on the new amount of money you have in the bank, rather than the original amount that you put in. ...

Compound interest means, for example, the money you have put into a bank, earns interest each year, but you earn interest upon the interest that was already added last year i.e. you earn interest on the new amount of money you have in the bank, rather than the original amount that you put in. Whereas simple interest, just means you earn exactly the same amount of interest each year, because you're always earning interest on the original amount.

It may sound complicated, but don't worry! Its actually very simple with an explained example.

Say we put £500 in the bank, and we earn 2% compound interest.
This means for the first year we earn 500 x 0.02 = £10 interest.

If this was simple interest, then we would earn £10 each year to add to our savings. But because this is compund interest, in the second year, we now earn interest on the new amount that we have = £510. So now in the second year, we earn £510 x 0.02 = £10.20 interest. So in the third year what do we earn? You guessed it: (510 + 10.20) x 0.02 = £10.404  and so on.

So you can see that each year we earn a little bit more interest because we have a little bit more in the bank. You can see how much you have all together after earning the interest each year, by multiplying by (1 + r/100) instead of just r/100 as we have done above. e.g. After one year we will have 500 x 1.02 = £510

We have a simple formula we can use instead of calculating each year separately which can take a very long time.

N = Nx (1 + r/100)t

N = Our new amount that we have in the bank after t years 

N0 = The original amount we put in the bank (£500 in our example)

r/100 = the percentage change per year (2/100 in our example = 0.02)

t = number of years the money is earning interest for

 

So for our example if we want to know how much we will have after 8 years of 2% compound interest, we do:

N = 500 x (1 + 0.02)8

    = 500 x 1.028    

    = £585.83

 

So we have earned £85.83 in interest over the 8 years :)

see more

2 years ago

528 views
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Rocio

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok