5829 questions

Describe and explain the formation of headlands and bays.

Headlands and bays result from coastlines that are formed of alternate sections of hard and soft rock. The areas of soft rock are more easily and quickly eroded whereas the harder rock is more resistant to processes of weathering and erosion. Where harder rock is present, headlands occur and where softer rock is being eroded, bays are formed. The processes of erosion that take part in this can be hydraulic action, attrition and different types of weathering. Constant attacking of the waves and material from the sea on the cliff face causes erosion of soft rock, leaving bits of land 'jutting out'.
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Sabrina W. A Level Geography tutor, GCSE Geography tutor, A Level Dra...

3 hours ago

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Which words are hyphenated?

Let's cover some of the cases. Adjectives The hyphen is required in adjectives which: 1. Denote the shade or combination of colors: светло-розовый, красно-желтый. 2. Derived from the compound nouns: бета-активный. 3. Сonsist of equal parts: Русско-Английский. 4. With use of the prefix "half": пол-лемона. Prepositions The hyphen is written if the following prepositions are used: из-под, из-за, по-за,по-над. Particles These particles are integrated in the text with the hyphen as well: -нибудь, -то, -тка, -либо, кое-. Numerals Remember that the numerals are written with the hyphen when there is a number in front of the word: 7-тысячный, 5-сотый. I hope this helps:)
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Anastasia Y. A Level Russian tutor, GCSE Russian tutor

5 hours ago

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How to write a good conclusion

The conclusion of your essay is where the question, and your argument, are directly addressed. As it takes place at the end of the essay many candidates will overlook the conclusion, leaving little time for it. As a result, the conclusion is often left rushed and poorly thought out. This can be a severe mistake as the conclusion is the final impression you will give the examiner of your argument, your factual knowledge, and the capability of your essay writing skills. To write an impactful conclusion you should essentially be condensing your essay into one paragraph. To do this you will have to be extremely critical of your own work. What are the best parts of your essay? What facts best support your argument you are trying to push, extract these from your essay and implement them in your conclusion. You should shy away from just readdressing each paragraph in a sentence, as this can lead to a repetitive essay that doesn’t show a great depth of skill. Rather you should address each point you make by drawing up the similarities or difference to each point. So rather than saying “The conservatives lost the 1906 election because, they lost the Boer war (1899-1902). To add to this, they failed to address any issues of poverty that had become evident during this time. Thirdly, they failed to have a clear stance on the free trade debate at the time.” Instead, sum up your argument and afterwards explain it by knitting and interweaving the several points you made throughout your essay in your conclusion, making links between them. This makes your argument clear in a new and interesting way. “The Conservative party lost the 1906 election not necessarily because the Liberal party was the popular candidate but rather because of how unpopular the Conservatives had become over the previous years in a variety of voter’s concerns. The disaster of the Boer war demonstrated the Conservative government’s incapability in foreign ventures. They also had become synonymous with the idea of uncaring leadership both domestically and in foreign relations. The Boer war demonstrated the ‘acts of barbarism’ the government was willing to take and their inaction towards the scaling evidence of poverty in the country led many to believe the government was cold. With the addition of the Party being so divided on the hotly debated topic of tariff form meant overall voters began to believe the conservatives were now incapable of decisive leadership, leading to their landslide loss in the 1906 election.”
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Daniel B. A Level History tutor, IB History tutor, GCSE History tutor...

6 hours ago

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How do I make my personal statement effective?

Although personal statements can seem like an overwhelming task, they don't need to be! They are what it says on the tin - a short piece of writing that’s about your interest in the subject and your experience. It can be difficult and might even seem cringe-worthy to write about yourself, but my main pieces of advice to avoid this, and make your personal statements more effective, are: 1. Avoid generic statements like ‘Since the age of 5 I’ve been interested in XYZ’. Instead, think about what genuinely interested you and made you apply for the subject, using evidence and perhaps referencing a particular occasion/lecture you attended/article you read to back this up. 2. Don’t use more words than you need to! Writing in simple language shows clarity and confidence, and makes it clear that you’ve got a genuine passion and are not hiding behind long words and sentences. 3. Focus on your skills. Even if you think you don’t have experience that is specific to your course, think again! For example, you might not have extensive experience of laboratory work, but perhaps you have held a job that required organisational skills and attention to detail – both of which are key for good scientific research. So, using simple language, focusing on your skills, and keeping your personal statement focused on the real-life experiences that led you to apply for the course will help make it a compelling piece of writing. Just take it step by step and you’ll get there!
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Lily R. A Level English Literature tutor, GCSE English Literature tut...

12 hours ago

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What do I do if I don’t know a word during a speaking exam?

Speaking exams can be scary, because you are put on the spot to ask questions that, especially at A level, may take some thinking about even in your native tongue. It is inevitable that you may struggle for a word from time to time and the examiner knows this. Therefore – Do. Not. Panic. The most important thing in these situations is not the fact that you don’t know one word – this is perfectly natural. You can in fact use these moments in your favour by expertly navigating around the missing word, as the thing that can impress the examiner is how you handle the situation. The more you practice your French speaking, the better you will become at covering up those moments when you can’t find a word you need. However, in the meantime, here are a couple of tips to make those moments smoother: 1) Try to find a way of getting around the word. If you really can’t remember it, try to find another word that also works. You can even explain and expand on the concept you are trying to convey. For example, if the verb ‘to teach’ (‘enseigner’) had slipped your mind during an exam, you could get around it by changing the sentence to use the noun ‘teacher’ (‘professeur’), or explaining, ‘what teachers do’ (ce que font les professeurs’). 2) Use conversational fillers. These again can work in your favour, and can even make your conversation sound more ‘French’, as the French are notorious for their use of certain sound patterns as they hesitate in conversations. Some typical fillers would be ‘Voyons’ – let’s see ‘Ben’ (pronounced ‘bah’) – Well/Um ‘Errr’
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Ashleigh  R. IB English Literature tutor, GCSE English Literature tut...

18 hours ago

Answered by Ashleigh , who has applied to tutor with MyTutor

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How do I form the conditional mood in French?

The conditional mood is one of the more straightforward tenses to conjugate in the French language. It is the equivalent of using ‘would’ in English. For example, ‘I would go’ – ‘j’irais’. To form the conditional mood in French, you need to know the verb endings: Je –ais Tu –ais Il/Elle/On –ait Nous – ions Vous – iez Ils/Elles – aient For the verb stem, that is, the section of the verb that comes before the ending, the infinitive is often used, with the ending added onto the end. The infinitive is the verb in its root form, before it has undergone any transformation. For example I would eat: Je mangerais They would talk: Ils parleraient She would go out: Elle sortirait However, as it is French, it goes without saying that there are exceptions for this rule. Although the endings of the conditional never vary from the above, there are some irregular verb stems. The most common of these include: Aller – ir Pouvoir - pourr Voir – verr Vouloir - voudr Avoir – aur Être- ser Devoir - Devr For example : I would have: j’aurais She would want: Elle voudrait They should: Ils devraient We could: Nous pourrions Luckily, the conditional mood is something of a hybrid of tense – the endings are the same as the imperfect, and the verb stems (regular and irregular) are the same as the future tense. So, it is only logical to learn these other two tenses as well as the conditional!
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Ashleigh  R. IB English Literature tutor, GCSE English Literature tut...

18 hours ago

Answered by Ashleigh , who has applied to tutor with MyTutor

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How do I time manage in an exam?

One word: plan. Again three times: plan, plan, plan. When approaching an exam, it is always helpful to attempt past questions. At first these need not be timed, as past exam papers are an excellent revision technique to spark your thinking. However, as the exam nears, practicing timed exam questions is crucial; this will help you become aware of what it is possible to write in the time allowed. A very important part of practicing past exam papers, is practicing how to effectively plan under a time limit. Planning is essential to any essay question in an exam, without exception. The more you revise, the briefer you’ll find these plans can become. A single key word can spark a whole idea, complete with quotes, context and your own interpretations. Therefore, taking 5 to 10 minutes at the start of the exam to plan your question can massively save you time as you write your essay, as you will have already decided on everything you are going to include, and the structure of your answer. The biggest time waster in an exam is often repetition, wasting valuable time by repeating ideas in a different format. An effective plan will help avoid this.
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Ashleigh  R. IB English Literature tutor, GCSE English Literature tut...

18 hours ago

Answered by Ashleigh , who has applied to tutor with MyTutor

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What is poetry?

This is a question that I asked myself, every day, from the ages of 11 to 18. It was only really in the first year of my degree that I began to formulate an answer for myself – and that last bit is the important part: what poetry is depends on your own opinion. You get to decide what poetry is for you. For me, poetry is verbal art. This is obviously broad, vague, and seemingly unhelpful. Poetry can be anything from a strictly formed sonnet, to the text messages you sent in a certain order for dramatic effect this morning. To decide what poetry is for you, read poetry!
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Ashleigh  R. IB English Literature tutor, GCSE English Literature tut...

18 hours ago

Answered by Ashleigh , who has applied to tutor with MyTutor

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