7439 questions

Integration question 1 - C1 2016 edexcel

Answer has to be explained verbally. A full written proof can be given.
See more
Mihir P. A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Economics tut...

2 days ago

Answered by Mihir, tutor with MyTutor

5 views

Surds question 3 - C1 2016 Edexcel

Answer has to be explained verbally. I can provide a full written proof.
See more
Mihir P. A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Economics tut...

2 days ago

Answered by Mihir, tutor with MyTutor

5 views

Describe the function of red blood cells and how they are suited to their function.

The primary function of red blood cells (RBCs) is to transport oxygen around the body. They contain haemoglobin, which oxygen attaches to in order to form oxyhaemoglobin. RBCs are very small in size and are flexible, which allows them access through narrow capillaries to deliver oxygen throughout the body. They do not contain nuclei (nor do they contain mitochondria or ER), allowing for more haemoglobin to be packed into the cell and therefore more oxygen to be carried within the cell. The bioconcave shape of RBCs gives them a large surface area to volume ratio, which increases the capacity of oxygen to diffuse into the cell. 
See more
Hafsa S. GCSE Biology tutor, GCSE Chemistry tutor, Mentoring -Persona...

2 days ago

Answered by Hafsa, tutor with MyTutor

8 views

How do you combine resistors is series and parallel?

In a series circuit each resistor will have the same current passing through it.  If we assume that the wires connecting the resistors have no resistance, then the total potential difference, V, is given by Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law; V=V1+V2+V3+… Using Ohm’s Law, V=IR, we get IR=IR1+IR2+IR3+… as the current is the same in each resistor we can cancel them out to get; R=R1+R2+R3+… Basically if you have 2 or more resistors in series the total resistance is simply the sum of each resistance. Combining resistances in parallel is a bit more complicated; in a parallel circuit each resistor will have the same potential difference, but the current flowing through them will not necessarily be the same.  If we start with the conservation of charge we get; I=I1+I2+I3+… using Ohm’s Law again gives us V/R=V/R1+V/R2+V/R3+… and as V is the same for all the resistors we get 1/R=1/R1+1/R2+1/R3+… If you have 2 or more resistors in parallel the reciprocal of the resistance (1 over the resistance) is the sum of the reciprocals of each resistance.
See more
Matt Q. A Level Physics tutor, A Level Maths tutor

2 days ago

Answered by Matt, who has applied to tutor with MyTutor

6 views

How does the heart work to pump blood around the body?

Firstly, I would ensure that the student understands the basics concepts of atrial systole, ventricular syotle and diastole and the pathway of the blood around the heart. Then I would further explain the concepts of electical activity in the heart including the sinoatrial node, atioventricular node, the Bundle of His and the Purkinjie fribres. I would encourage the student to attempt to formulate an answer to a past paper using their understand of heart function and help them to put key words that examiners are looking for in their answer. I have written an example of how I would answer an exam question of this nature below: The heart is myogenic meaning that the electircal impulse,which stimulates the heart muscle to contract, originates from the muscle tissue itself in an area called the sinoatrial node (SAN). The SAN is located in the right atrium of the heart. From here the electrical impulse spreads across the right atrium, causing it to depolarise, contract and force blood into the right ventricle, until it reaches the atioventricular node (AVN). At the AVN, the electrical impulse is delayed from entering the Bundle of His so that the atria can fully contract. Once, this has occured the electrical impulse passes down the Bundle of His and into the Purkinjie fibres which spread through and cause depolarisation of the ventricles and hence cau the ventricles to contract. Blood is forced into the pulmonary artery and the aorta, where it may travel to the lungs and the rest of the body respectively. 
See more
Sophie C. A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Biology tutor, A Level Chemistr...

3 days ago

Answered by Sophie, tutor with MyTutor

10 views

A stone, of mass m , falls vertically downwards under gravity through still water. The initial speed of the stone is u . Find an expression for v at time t .

1) Ma = mg - Lmv         2) dv/dt = g-Lv 3)-1/L *(ln(g -Lv)/(g - Lu)) = t              4) g - Lv/ g - Lu = e-Lt 5) Rearrange to.... v = 1/L *(g-(g - Lu) e-Lt) Missed some steps as it was relatively long, can perform this fully in person during the interview if preferred.  
See more
Joseph W. GCSE Physics tutor, A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Maths tutor

3 days ago

Answered by Joseph, who has applied to tutor with MyTutor

14 views

What is the cosine rule and how do I use it?

The cosine rule, a2=b2+c2-2bccosA, where a, b, & c are the sides of a triangle and A is the angle opposite side a, is the general version of Pythagoras' Theorem and applies to any triangle, not just right angled triangles. The cosine rule should be used when you encounter a problem involving all 3 sides of a triangle and 1 internal angle.  For example you are given the length of 2 sides and the angle between them and you are asked to find the length of the third side.
See more
Matt Q. A Level Physics tutor, A Level Maths tutor

3 days ago

Answered by Matt, who has applied to tutor with MyTutor

4 views

How do I structure an essay question?

In history essays you need to show that you understand the question you are being asked and that you can illustrate several different interpretations, backing each with evidence. An introduction is needed to start off where you briefly outline the essay. Within the main body of the essay you then need to explain several different points that answer the question, with the one you consider the most significant first if possible. When going through different points it is best to avoid a yes/no answer (e.g. the 1930s were a time of depression because...followed by the 1930s were a time of prosperity because...). If you can integrate the different interpretations into specific points then you will be more likely to get higher marks (e.g. you could talk about high vs low unemployment in different areas, then move on to something else). This will make your essay more interesting to read than a yes/no structure. In the same regard it is good to try and talk about significance to the question within the main body and not just in the conclusion. Every essay needs a conclusion where you make your argument clearly and relate it directly to the question, but it helps to do this very briefly throughout the essay.   
See more
Joshua O. IB History tutor, 13 Plus  History tutor, GCSE History tuto...

3 days ago

Answered by Joshua, who has applied to tutor with MyTutor

6 views

Your difficult questions, answered

Our tutors get asked all sorts of hard questions in their tutorials. They use this page to write up the most common questions so you can access them for free.

Wondering how MyTutor works?
Here's a two minute explanation.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How do we connect with a tutor?

Who are the tutors?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

How it works

We use cookies to improve your site experience. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok