Is the British Prime Minister become Presidential?

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While critics seem to be regularly telling us that we are moving towards a more Americanized system characterized by a growth in spatial leadership (the presentation of the party leader as the 'relatable outsider' with a personal ideological stance) this is difficult to reconcile with the way British politics is currently operating. What in actual fact we may be experiencing are a series of trends that allow UK Prime Ministers to resemble presidents but never truly become them. This is simply due to the fact that constitutionally, Prime Ministers cannot ever be presidents due to a system of parliamentary government rather than presidential government. For instance, the UK does not have a constitutional separation of powers between the legislature and executive, as characterises the US system. While many factors point towards converse thinking; the growth of personalised leadership, the development of a direct relationship charisma- based between the Prime Minister and the public and the growing political significance of the mass media in affecting power balances within the executive, it has been proved such with Thatcher that the Prime Minister cannot remain in power without the support of a Cabinet like support base and that is why a presidential system will never prevail. In short, it is not possible for presidentialism to be viable in the UK without a serious overhaul of the British constitution.

Leyla R. Mentoring -Personal Statements- tutor, GCSE English Literatu...

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