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How is the Latin future participle formed?

In Latin, the future participle literally means being about to X or on the point of doing X. It is active, and has the form:

amaturus, amatura, amaturum

The best way of spotting the future participle is to look for the -ur- extension (just like English future).

It is formed from the supine (4th principal part):

amo, amare, amavi, amatum --> amaturus -a -um

moneo, monere, monui, monitum --> moniturus -a -um

rego, regere, rexi, rectum --> recturus -a -um

audio, audire, audivi, auditum --> auditurus -a -um

Andrew P. GCSE Classical Greek tutor, 13 plus  Classical Greek tutor,...

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