267 Medical School Preparation Mentoring questions

Do I need work experience to apply to medical school?

Whilst for some medical schools work experience is not mandatory, for the majority, it is highly recommended. Gaining work experience in a healthcare profession is not only valuable in ensuring that medical school is the right path for you, but it also demonstrates that you are keen to help others and are an avid learner. The work experience that you aquire is not only useful for applying to medical school itself, but also for if you apply to additional courses to supplement your learning and for a future job.
I would recommend trying to gain experience in a variety of healthcare settings. For example, many care homes are always looking for volunteers and some hospitals will offer work experience placements for a week.
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Calum H.

7 hours ago

Answered by Calum, Medical School Preparation Mentoring tutor with MyTutor

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How important is getting to shadow a doctor before applying to medical school?

Not at all, not even slightly. There is a common myth that unless you have shadowed a doctor or had experience in a medical setting you will not even be considered for interview. What medical schools look for is academic ability, commitment to public service and good communication skills. As long as you can demonstrate all three of these very well in your personal statement you should be fine. For example working at a local scout group or volunteering in the community (i.e. in an old people's home) would be an amazing way to demonstrate your skills that exam results simply could not do. Some students are lucky enough to have experience in a hospital setting however this is not possible for many students who simply don't have the connections to acquire such sought after places.
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Adam C.

8 hours ago

Answered by Adam, who has applied to tutor Medical School Preparation Mentoring with MyTutor

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How important is getting to shadow a doctor before applying to medical school?

Not at all, not even slightly. There is a common myth that unless you have shadowed a doctor or had experience in a medical setting you will not even be considered for interview. What medical schools look for is academic ability, commitment to public service and good communication skills. As long as you can demonstrate all three of these very well in your personal statement you should be fine. For example working at a local scout group or volunteering in the community (i.e. in an old people's home) would be an amazing way to demonstrate your skills that exam results simply could not do. Some students are lucky enough to have experience in a hospital setting however this is not possible for many students who simply don't have the connections to acquire such sought after places.
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Adam C.

9 hours ago

Answered by Adam, who has applied to tutor Medical School Preparation Mentoring with MyTutor

0 views

How important is getting to shadow a doctor before applying to medical school?

Not at all, not even slightly. There is a common myth that unless you have shadowed a doctor or had experience in a medical setting you will not even be considered for interview. What medical schools look for is academic ability, commitment to public service and good communication skills. As long as you can demonstrate all three of these very well in your personal statement you should be fine. For example working at a local scout group or volunteering in the community (i.e. in an old people's home) would be an amazing way to demonstrate your skills that exam results simply could not do. Some students are lucky enough to have experience in a hospital setting however this is not possible for many students who simply don't have the connections to acquire such sought after places.
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Adam C.

10 hours ago

Answered by Adam, who has applied to tutor Medical School Preparation Mentoring with MyTutor

0 views

How important is getting to shadow a doctor before applying to medical school?

Not at all, not even slightly. There is a common myth that unless you have shadowed a doctor or had experience in a medical setting you will not even be considered for interview. What medical schools look for is academic ability, commitment to public service and good communication skills. As long as you can demonstrate all three of these very well in your personal statement you should be fine. For example working at a local scout group or volunteering in the community (i.e. in an old people's home) would be an amazing way to demonstrate your skills that exam results simply could not do. Some students are lucky enough to have experience in a hospital setting however this is not possible for many students who simply don't have the connections to acquire such sought after places.
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Adam C.

10 hours ago

Answered by Adam, who has applied to tutor Medical School Preparation Mentoring with MyTutor

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What can I expect in a panel interview for medical school compared to MMI and what can I do to help prepare?

Expectation:
Prior to your interview it is important to understand the difference between an MMI interview and a panel interview and to know which format will be used by the universities you apply for. Typically, more traditionally structured courses will use the panel interview format whilst PBL/integrated courses may use MMI. Based on personal experience, a panel interview is with 2-3 interviewers lasting for approximately 20-30 minutes. Think of the interview as a conversation. In contrast, MMI comprises of a series of 5-10 minute stations each targeting a skill or interest and specific criteria will be marked accordingly using a mark scheme. There will be different interviewers at each station.
Preparation:
To understand the format of interview used at each university I found it useful to look at the university comparison tool on The Medic Portal. For certain panel interviews you may be able to find out a little more about the kind of questions they are likely to ask. For example, Oxbridge will take a more academic approach and UCL will refer to your BMAT essay at interview. Regardless of this, it is important to know your personal statement really well and be able to expand on key areas (for example, work experience, volunteering and extra curricular activities). Make sure that you are able to reflect on what you have learnt from your experiences and that you can state how these experiences may help you as both a medical student and doctor. Stay up to date on basic medical ethics and law and be confident in discussing current affairs. Above all else, to shine at interview it is important to remain calm, be confident and be yourself!
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Rebecca J.

15 hours ago

Answered by Rebecca, Medical School Preparation Mentoring tutor with MyTutor

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Why is confidentiality important and when might it be broken?

Confidentiality essentially concerns the privacy of a patient's personal/identifiable details, with information only being given on a need-to-know basis to relevant professionals and ensuring the patient is aware of this. It is important because it improves trust, the information given may be sensitive and it is also important when considering safeguarding of vulnerable people (children and older people).
It may be broken if: The patient consents (e.g. for a study), it is of benefit to a patient lacking capacity (e.g. discussing with relatives to act in best interests), it is required by law (e.g. notifiable disease, birth), or it is in the interest of a single person or the general public (HIV, STIs, TB).
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Soonyiu Y.

2 days ago

Answered by Soonyiu, Medical School Preparation Mentoring tutor with MyTutor

1 view

Where do I start with preparing for medical interviews?

It's normal to feel intimidated with medical interview prep! Start with giving yourself a high 5 for getting an interview, or a high 5 for starting to prepare early. There are a few sections you can broadly split your preparation into - (a) examples and reflections of your work experience/volunteering/extra-curriculars/work, (b) medical theory (e.g. the structure of the NHS, medical training, clinical governance, ethics), and (c) interview technique and practicing. Once the first two are underway, practice is crucial to ensure you feel confident in answering different types of questions and in your body language/manner. The different universities you've applied to may vary in style of interview and length of questions, so it's important to cater your practice to those.
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Sufia H.

3 days ago

Answered by Sufia, who has applied to tutor Medical School Preparation Mentoring with MyTutor

1 view

Where do I start with preparing for medical interviews?

It's normal to feel intimidated with medical interview prep! Start with giving yourself a high 5 for getting an interview, or a high 5 for starting to prepare early. There are a few sections you can broadly split your preparation into - (a) examples and reflections of your work experience/volunteering/extra-curriculars/work, (b) medical theory (e.g. the structure of the NHS, medical training, clinical governance, ethics), and (c) interview technique and practicing. Once the first two are underway, practice is crucial to ensure you feel confident in answering different types of questions and in your body language/manner. The different universities you've applied to may vary in style of interview and length of questions, so it's important to cater your practice to those.
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Sufia H.

3 days ago

Answered by Sufia, who has applied to tutor Medical School Preparation Mentoring with MyTutor

2 views

Where do I start with preparing for medical interviews?

It's normal to feel intimidated with medical interview prep! Start with giving yourself a high 5 for getting an interview, or a high 5 for starting to prepare early. There are a few sections you can broadly split your preparation into - (a) examples and reflections of your work experience/volunteering/extra-curriculars/work, (b) medical theory (e.g. the structure of the NHS, medical training, clinical governance, ethics), and (c) interview technique and practicing. Once the first two are underway, practice is crucial to ensure you feel confident in answering different types of questions and in your body language/manner. The different universities you've applied to may vary in style of interview and length of questions, so it's important to cater your practice to those.
See more
Sufia H.

3 days ago

Answered by Sufia, who has applied to tutor Medical School Preparation Mentoring with MyTutor

2 views
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