MYTUTOR SUBJECT ANSWERS

605 views

How do you write a good hypothesis?

The way to write a good hypothesis is to follow a 3 step proess.

1) Identify your variables and operationalise them.

2) Identify whether you are looking for a difference or a relationship.

3) Identify whether you are going to write a directional or non-directional hypothesis.

As long as your hypothesis includes these three things then it will be a strong statement.

Let's look at a specific example to see how we can do this:

The hypothesis we want to write is for a piece of research which is looking to see if the length of sleep impacts memory.

So let's go to step 1.

1) Our independent variable (which is the variable that we are able to change and manipulate) in this case is the ​length of sleep​, and the dependent variable (which we cannot control but is what we measure) for this piece of research is memory.​ But now we need to operationalise them. Operationalising variables means explain how we measure the variable. So for example we could operationalise length of sleep to be ​'people who slept more than 6 hours in comparison to people who slept less than 6 hours.'​ You often find that there are many ways to operationalise the dependent variable as something like memory can be measured in many ways. One way which you could operationalise the variable would be ​'number of words correctly recalled from a list.'

So now we have both our operationalised variables, we can move on to step two.

2) We need to decide if we are looking for a difference or a relationship. A difference would be if we are directly comparing two things, whereas a relationship would be showing how one thing impacts another. If you are testing for a difference then your hypothesis will sound something like 'group A is more/less/different to group B' whereas if you are testing for a relationship you will say ​'A increases/decreases/changes as B increases.' ​​For this piece of research we are comparing people with more than 6 hours of sleep with those who had less than 6 hours of sleep so we are looking for a ​difference​. This means our hypothesis will sound like ​'people who sleep more than 6 hours will .... more/less/differently to people who slept less than 6 hours.'

Now we can move onto the final step of writing the hypothesis.

3) A hypothesis can be written as either directional (when you predict what the results will show, and so say 'A will be more than B or A will be less than B') or it can be non-directional (which is when you know that there will be a difference but do not know which one will be more or less so write 'A will be significantly different to B'). You can pick which type of hypothesis you want to write (unless the exam question specifies!) but for this example let's write a directional hypothesis. If we predict that more sleep will improve your memory we would write people who sleep more will have better memories than people who sleep less.

But now let's put everything together and write our final excellent hypothesis.

'People who sleep for more than 6 hours will recall more words correctly from a list than those who slept for less than 6 hours.

Emma M. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Psychology tutor, A Level Maths tutor

1 year ago

Answered by Emma, an A Level Psychology tutor with MyTutor


Still stuck? Get one-to-one help from a personally interviewed subject specialist

33 SUBJECT SPECIALISTS

£20 /hr

Dorothea C.

Degree: Psychology (Bachelors) - Exeter University

Subjects offered: Psychology, German+ 1 more

Psychology
German
French

“About Me My name is Dorothea Christmann and I am a Psychology student at Exeter University. I have always had a real passion for languages and I come from a family of linguists. I did French, German and Spanish at A-Level along with ...”

£24 /hr

Sarah T.

Degree: PGCE (Masters) - Durham University

Subjects offered: Psychology, Maths+ 1 more

Psychology
Maths
Chemistry

“About me: In 2015 I graduated from Durham University. Whilst there I had the most amazing time studying Psychology, Chemistry and Education. Science has always interested me and I find it fascinating how we can use scientific methods ...”

£24 /hr

Maddy M.

Degree: Psychology (Bachelors) - Exeter University

Subjects offered: Psychology, Sociology+ 2 more

Psychology
Sociology
Maths
-Personal Statements-

“About Me: I am currently studying Psychology at the University of Exeter having had a realpassion for it from the age of 15. Psychology is a vast and ever-evolving science, aspects which fuel my interest for it. My own interests with...”

About the author

£24 /hr

Emma M.

Degree: Natural Sciences (Bachelors) - Durham University

Subjects offered: Psychology, Maths

Psychology
Maths

“ I am currently studying Natural Sciences (Maths and Psychology) at Durham University. I have had a passion for Maths and Psychology since the moment I started studying them and am keen toshare my enthusiasm for these subject through ...”

You may also like...

Posts by Emma

How do you differentiate y = 5 x^3 + 1/2 x^2 + 3x -4

How do you write a good hypothesis?

Other A Level Psychology questions

How effective is psychodynamic therapy in treating schizophrenia? (Emphasis on evaluating rather than outlining)

What is Bowlby’s Evolutionary Theory of Attachment

What is the Behaviourist explanation for the development of phobias?

What are the limitations of the cognitive approach to psychology?

View A Level Psychology tutors

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok