MYTUTOR SUBJECT ANSWERS

1163 views

Why at room temperature is H2O a liquid, but H2S is a gas?

This question is basically just asking you why water has a higher boiling point that H2S. So you need to ask yourself what is the factor which means water has a higher boiling point? If you remember back to electronegativies of the elements in the periodic table, you may recall that the elements in the top right hand corner are the most electronegitive (i.e. they pull electron density towards them). Oxygen sits above sulfur in row 6 of the periodic table and so is more electronegative. Furthermore, you may also recall that F, N and O are the three most electronegative atoms in the table. This property means that when they are attached to a hydrogen (which has a much lower electronegativity) there is a difference in electronegativity. This different is particularly large for H-F, H-N and H-O, resulting in a special intermolecular interaction called hydrogen bonding which is exclusive to these bonds. Therefore, H2O has a higher boiling point than H2S because H2O has the ability to hydrogen bond whereas H2S does not. Hydrogen bonds are stronger than other intermolecular interactions such as van der Waals interactions or dipole-dipole interations, so require more energy to break them. Hence, water has a higher boiling point (or is a liquid at room temperature) whereas H2S is a gas at room temperature.

Melissa K. A Level Chemistry tutor, GCSE Chemistry tutor, GCSE Japane...

1 year ago

Answered by Melissa, an A Level Chemistry tutor with MyTutor


Still stuck? Get one-to-one help from a personally interviewed subject specialist

98 SUBJECT SPECIALISTS

Yasmin A. A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Biology tutor, A Level Chemistr...
£24 /hr

Yasmin A.

Degree: Medicine (Other) - University College London University

Subjects offered:Chemistry, Science+ 6 more

Chemistry
Science
Physics
Maths
Human Biology
-Personal Statements-
-Medical School Preparation-

“Hello! I am a medical student at University College London.  All students have an individual learning style - this is why my teaching is tailored to you. With experience of tutoring students aged 6-19, I am confident in adapting my s...”

£20 /hr

George N.

Degree: Chemistry (Masters) - York University

Subjects offered:Chemistry, Physics

Chemistry
Physics

“20 year old second year chemistry student at the University of York. Drummer, guitarist, rugby player and radio host who has experience and a love for tutoring.”

£20 /hr

Jay G.

Degree: Biological Sciences (Biochemistry) (Bachelors) - Edinburgh University

Subjects offered:Chemistry, Maths+ 2 more

Chemistry
Maths
Mandarin
Biology

“I am here not only to help you get better at exams, but to help you enjoy your subject more ”

About the author

Melissa K.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Chemistry (Masters) - Durham University

Subjects offered:Chemistry, Science+ 2 more

Chemistry
Science
Maths
Japanese

“About me: Hi, I'm Melissa and I'm a student at Durham University with a passion for chemistry. I love teaching the subject and imparting my enthusiasm on to others.  I have a lot of tutoring experience. At school I tutored maths and ...”

You may also like...

Other A Level Chemistry questions

What is the difference in kinetics between a 0th, 1st and 2nd order reaction?

How do I calculate the Gibbs free energy change for a reaction when given the entropy change, enthalpy change and the reaction conditions>

When composing a mechanism in organic chemistry, how do I use curly arrows?

Why does the solubility of Group 2 hydroxides in water increase down the group?

View A Level Chemistry tutors

We use cookies to improve your site experience. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok