'Reason in madness' - Explore the varieties and significance of madness in King Lear.

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Lear experiences lucidity, 'reason', and exhibits his most profound moments when he is mad. This is the central irony in Lear and reflects both the contradiction, which is a convention of Classical tragedy and the essential uncertainty of the human condition, which the play ultimately expresses. 

-  'Reason' in madness - as the idea that the suffering of both Lear and his foil Gloucester is not futilie - relate to the tragic vision. 

- Either: suffering as productive: Lear as affirmative of the Christianity 

- Or: there is essentially no 'reason' in the suffering - overwhelming impression of waste. 

Saoirse W. A Level English Literature tutor, GCSE English Literature ...

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