mother-and-son-doing-yoga
MyTutor for Parents

Finding balance: 6 ways to help your teen study (and avoid burnout)

Easter holidays are a good chunk of time for your teen to revise. You want them to get on track with their studies, but not to overdo it either (it is a break after all!). Here, we go through 6 ways you can help them find the right balance between revising and relaxing this Easter.

  1. Help them create a revision timetable.
  2. The Pomodoro technique helps them balance study and breaks.
  3. Group courses mean revision time is covered.
  4. Encourage them to study with friends.
  5. Take them on a fun study day out.
  6. Make sure they switch off completely too.

1. Help them create a revision timetable.

timetable-illustration

It’s all about making a plan–and sticking to it. The best way for your teen to get organised is by putting a revision timetable together. They can download a template and fill in a study schedule for the Easter holidays. And to make the most of their timetable, they can divide study time between subjects– setting aside more time on those they find challenging. They’ll feel motivated as they tick off revision blocks from their timetable. And blocking out time on their schedule for fun activities like going to the cinema is important too. This way they’ve got things to look forward to. 

2. The Pomodoro technique helps them balance study and breaks.

The Pomodoro technique is a brilliant way for them to balance revision and breaks. Education experts recommend using Pomodoro, since the brain learns best in shorter bursts of study (25 minutes) with breaks built in between. And breaks are actually an important part of learning. The brain is busy linking up information while your teen rests up–how convenient! 

Here’s how the Pomodoro works: 

Step 1: They’ll choose a subject to revise in. For example, GCSE English.

Step 2: Next they’ll set the Pomodoro timer (or Pomodoro app) for 25 mins.

Step 3: Your teen can start revising their subject. It’s best if they focus on one 

So for example, working with flashcards.

Step 4: When the timer rings, they’ll take a short break (about 5 mins). 

Step 5: They’ll repeat steps 2-4 for their second Pomodoro round. It’s a good idea to set aside at least an hour (so 2 Pomodoros) and to stick to the same subject in that time. After the 2 Pomodoros, they’ll take a longer break.

3. Group courses mean revision time is covered.

online-classroom-mytutor

If your teen needs a bit of extra support in a subject, or they just want more guidance with their revision– group courses can be a winning option. Our 5-day group tuition courses run at the same time every day during the Easter holidays. Because of this routine, it’s easier for your teen to switch off after. Plus they’ll be led by an expert tutor who’s planned fun ways for them to learn the material. And revising with other students (max 6) means they’re part of a community. They can cheer each other on, and feel supported.

4. Encourage them to study with friends.

There are a lot of benefits to studying with friends. For one thing, your teen will have company when usually revising can feel lonely. They can quiz each other, which is a good way to help make information stick in their long-term memory. They can also teach and explain topics to their friend–another study activity that’s great for helping them remember. 

5. Take them on a fun study day out.

If you can take your teen to see a Shakespeare play or visit a museum, it can bring the subject they’re revising to life. But you don’t have to go very far to mix things up either. Just taking them out to study in a different environment, like in a cafe works a treat. Prof Barbara Oakley says it’s a good idea for them to change where they revise since the brain gets used to certain things. If they’re always studying in their bedroom, it can be harder for them to focus in a new place like an exam hall. Even just studying at the kitchen table instead can prep them for recalling info in a new environment.

6. Make sure they switch off completely too.

With all they’ve got going on at school, it’s important for them to just switch off too. And this means being away from their screens where they might mindlessly scroll for hours. You can take them to the cinema, or encourage them to see their friends. A bit of time away from studying can help them feel refreshed and motivated to get back into it. 

It’s tricky to find the right balance between study and switching off during the holidays. But you’ll know what’s best for your teen. Together, you can make a plan that helps them recharge and get ready to take on exams.

3 months ago
MyTutor for Parents

4 signs of burnout in your teen– and how to help them through it

They’ve been hearing about exams for ages. So it’s no surprise that lots of teens ... Read more

6 months ago
MyTutor for Parents

6 ways to help your teen make the most of Spring Term, Part 2

Average reading time: 4 minutes Half term is done and dusted and exams are coming up f... Read more

3 years ago
Exams and Revision

How to help your dyslexic teen do their best in exams

Today it’s thought that 1 in 10 people suffer from dyslexia. When a dyslexic child h... Read more