What is the difference between what is presented and how it is presented?

This is a big question at GCSE literature, because there is a heavy focus on both interpretation and method. The difference between what is presented and how it is presented is just identifying the literary features which create the effect you are discussing. This sounds a bit complex, but we can break it down into smaller steps:

You can identify the two questions as separate -- what is it presentin, and how is it being done -- and you probably won't have too much trouble answering the first part -- saying what is being presented.

Now, the way to adress the second part -- how it is presented -- is to simply ask yourself how do I know this?

Sounds easy, right? I know it isn't always as easy that, but it's a really good place to start. Look at the text in question, and just circle or highlight the bits that give you the impression that is your answer to the first part of the question.

Now, with some revision, you'll have learned some techniques and methods which writers use to portray things. The thing to do next is to look at your highlighted words, phrases or sections, and identify the techniques being demonstrated in them. Make a note of this -- always annotate a text for your own reference.

The final step is the one that gets the best marks. You must draw the connection between the two parts of your answer, very cearly, and state how the methods you identified create the effect you identified.

This may sound difficult, but really all you've already done this, because you know they produce the effect. So, if you can quote the relevant word or phrase, identify the features or method, and say that they produce the effect, you've done very well already.

Oliver W. A Level Philosophy tutor, A Level English tutor, A Level En...

8 months ago

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