What are the stages of mitosis?

  • Google+ icon
  • LinkedIn icon
  • 707 views

Mitosis consists of four basic phases.

1. Prophase

2. Metaphase

3. Anaphase

4. Telophase

It is a common mistake to believe that interphase is part of mitosis. In fact, interphase is just a preparation stage for mitosis, and so is NOT part of mitosis.

I use PEOPLE, MEET, AND, TALK to help me remember the order of each stage.

Prophase, is the shortening and thickening of the chromosomes from chromatin. During late prophase, the centrioles move to opposite ends of the nucleus, called the poles. The nucleolus disappears and the nuclear membrane disintegrates.

Metaphase sees the chromosomes lining up along the equator, and being attached to the centrioles via the spindle produced. This spindle is attached to the chromosomes centromeres. 

Anaphase is the splitting of the chromosomes into chromatids. These are pulled to oppsit poles by the spindle. 

Telophase is the reformation of the nuclear membrane, to form two cells. Cytokinesis follows, which splits the cell into two daughter cells.

Josh J. A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Biology tutor, A Level Geography ...

About the author

is an online A Level Biology tutor with MyTutor studying at Sheffield University

How MyTutor Works

Still stuck? Get one-to-one help from a personally interviewed subject specialist.

95% of our customers rate us

Browse tutors

We use cookies to improve your site experience. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok