what are the differences between involuntary, cardiac and voluntary muscle?

  • Google+ icon
  • LinkedIn icon
  • 7759 views

Involuntary muscle (or smooth muscle) is innervated by the autonomic nervous system and therefore is not under conscious control. It is not striated - rather, muscle cells contain small bundles of actin and myosin. It is found in the walls of the intestine, the iris, the walls of arteries and the walls of the uterus and cervix. Involuntary muscle contracts slowly but tires very slowly.

Cardiac muscle is found in the heart and can be divided into three sub-types of muscle: atrial muscle, ventricular muscle, and specialised excitatory and conductive muscle fibres. Cardiac muscle is myogenic meaning muscle fibres can stimulate contractions without needing input from a nerve impulse. Cardiac muscle is striated and contracts powerfully thoughout the life without tiring.

Voluntary muscle is responsible for causing movements of the skeleton at joints. It is innervated by the somatic nervous system. Voluntary muscle is striated and contracts quickly and powerfully but tires quickly.

Dani E. A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Biology tutor, A Level Chemistry ...

About the author

is an online A Level Biology tutor with MyTutor studying at Oxford, Keble College University

Still stuck? Get one-to-one help from a personally interviewed subject specialist.

95% of our customers rate us

Browse tutors

We use cookies to improve your site experience. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok