Describe the process of translation in protein synthesis

  • Google+ icon
  • LinkedIn icon
  • 2457 views

-  Following transcription, the mRNA (messenger RNA) leaves the nucleus via the nuclear pores and enters the cytoplasm. It then attaches to a ribosome

- tRNA molecules in the cytoplasm carry a single amino acid. They also have 3 base pairs of RNA molecules that correspond to that amino acid. This is called the anticodon.

- A tRNA molecule with a complementary anticodon to the first codon (the start codon) of the mRNA molecule binds to the mRNA molecule. This is complementary base pairing.

- Hydrogen bonds form between the mRNA and tRNA molecules. 

- A second tRNA molecule binds to the adjacent codon on the mRNA molecule. This allows a peptide bond to form between the protiens on the tRNA molecules.

- The peptide bond is formed by a condensation reaction. 

The first tRNA molecule leaves the ribosome

- The ribosome moves along the mRNA and the process repeats. The length of the polypeptide chain increases and translation stops when the ribosome reaches the stop codon on mRNA.

Florence L. A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Biology tutor, GCSE Chemistry...

About the author

is an online A Level Biology tutor with MyTutor studying at Bristol University

Still stuck? Get one-to-one help from a personally interviewed subject specialist.

95% of our customers rate us

Browse tutors

We use cookies to improve your site experience. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok