MYTUTOR SUBJECT ANSWERS

890 views

How do I write a poetry comparison essay?

The most important part of any English essay is the planning: you need to make sure that you know what you are writing about before you start. With a poetry comparison essay, you will usually be looking for similarities and differences in the poems. For a coursework essay, you can take your time over this, and the same skills can be used to do the same thing efficiently in an exam. 

Step 1: READ!! Read the poems, and then read them again, and probably again just to be sure.

Step 2: After reading through both poems thoroughly, you can make notes for each poem according to STRIP factors: Structure, Tone, Rhythm/Rhyme, Imagery and Person. "Person" can refer to both the people reading the poem, and the 'speaker' or the voice telling the poem, so you could make notes on each one individually if relevant.

Step 3: The next step is to put all of these ideas into a plan, which compares the use of these STRIP factors. Usually GCSE questions are based on the themes, so you will be focusing on how the STRIP factors are used to create  (or challenge!) the theme shared by the two poems. Comparing your notes, you are aiming to find a similarilty and a difference in the language - that is, imagery, tone, and person; as well as a similarity and a difference in structure - which includes the 'structure' part of STRIP as well as rhythm and rhyme. 

Once all that planning is done and dusted, you can write the essay! 

Part 1: Introduction: The introduction should be short and clearly explain which poems you will be writing about, and what it is in each poem that you will be discussing. 

Part 2: Body: This is where all those similarities and differences go: it will depend on the poems, but usually it is best to alternate similarlity and difference. This will mean you have four paragraphs, which could go like this:

Similarity (Language)

Difference (Language)

Similarity (Structure)

Difference (Structure)

Part 3: Conclusion: After these four paragraphs, you can write your conclusion, which should be a few sentances long, and explicitly answer both the question and the introduction. 

And you're done! 

Molly D. GCSE English Language tutor, GCSE English Literature tutor, ...

2 years ago

Answered by Molly, a GCSE English Literature tutor with MyTutor

Still stuck? Get one-to-one help from a personally interviewed subject specialist

126 SUBJECT SPECIALISTS

£18 /hr

Shona H.

Degree: English (Bachelors) - Exeter University

Subjects offered: English Literature, Psychology

English Literature
Psychology

“Hello! My name is Shona and I am currently studying English at the University of Exeter. I am offering tutoring in English at both GCSE and A-Level, as well as psychology at A-Level. I understand how challenging and stressful exams can...”

£18 /hr

Ruby O.

Degree: Law (Bachelors) - Bristol University

Subjects offered: English Literature, English Language

English Literature
English Language

“An Introduction to Me Hi, my name is Ruby O'Brien and I am currently in my 1st year at Bristol University studying Law! I achieved an A* in English Literature at A Level, and A*s in both English Language and Literature at GCSE. I love...”

MyTutor guarantee

£18 /hr

Sophie L.

Degree: Romantic and Victorian Literary Studies (Masters) - Durham University

Subjects offered: English Literature, English Language+ 2 more

English Literature
English Language
-Personal Statements-

“I am a postgraduate student at Durham University, studying a Masters in Romantic and Victorian Literary Studies. I have been a tutor of English Language and Literature for three years now and I am extremeley enthusiastic about the aca...”

About the author

£18 /hr

Molly D.

Degree: English Literature (Bachelors) - Exeter University

Subjects offered: English Literature, English Language+ 1 more

English Literature
English Language

“Top tutor from the renowned Russell university group, ready to help you improve your grades.”

MyTutor guarantee

You may also like...

Other GCSE English Literature questions

How can I ensure that I get into the top bands for my OCR GCSE English Literature essays?

How is violence portrayed in Macbeth?

How can I effectively analyse an unseen poem in exam conditions?

What is are metaphors and why are they used?

View GCSE English Literature tutors

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok