MYTUTOR SUBJECT ANSWERS

239 views

What is the best to approach the analysis of an unseen text?

Firstly, it is pivotal to understand that everybody sitting the exam is in the same boat as you; so relax, take a deep breath.

Keep in mind the amount of time you have to answer the question - do not compromise on this at all.

Read over the extract thoroughly, if you can then definitely do it twice. Whilst reading, if something stands out to you then just make sure you identify this in some way. A small tick next to the section is sufficient, but so is underlining it - whatever YOU are comfortable with.

Identify what type of extract it it; is it prose, or a poem, a soliloquy, is its purpose to argue or persuade? Knowing the form of the extract will make addressing the question with the right type of technique much easier!

Then read over the questions that are there for you to choose from. See whichever one caters to your thoughts the best; what sticks out to you. Remember to read the keyword within the question - the operative word, it will tell you how to direct your answer. 

Make a quick plan as to what links you can make between the extract ad the question; what can you use as evidence your argument, what is a good quote to include and so on. Spend no more than a few minutes on this, the plan will not get you marks - your writing will, but it will help focus you.

Start writing the answer, being sure to be succinct yet thorough, keep referring back to the question so that your writing does not become tangential. 

Have a strong introduction which just sets out your writing, three solid points, or maybe four slightly smaller ones, and then a conclusion including a judgment. 

Srishti D. GCSE Geography tutor, A Level English Literature tutor, GC...

7 months ago

Answered by Srishti, a GCSE English Literature tutor with MyTutor

Still stuck? Get one-to-one help from a personally interviewed subject specialist

130 SUBJECT SPECIALISTS

£22 /hr

Megan T.

Degree: English (Bachelors) - Exeter University

Subjects offered: English Literature, History+ 1 more

English Literature
History
English

“I am an English Literature student at Exeter University, and I have just started my second year here. I have always loved reading and analysying texts, so am excited to inspire you too. I do realise that literature can sometimes be a ...”

£18 /hr

Aruna P.

Degree: Law (Bachelors) - LSE University

Subjects offered: English Literature, Spanish+ 4 more

English Literature
Spanish
Sociology
Economics
.LNAT.
-Personal Statements-

“I am a future lawyer and a self-proclaimed expert on surviving the university admission process, trying to pass on mypassion for the humanities to those I tutor. Only last year, I was in your position, trying to write a competitive a...”

£20 /hr

Timothy G.

Degree: English Literature (Bachelors) - Bristol University

Subjects offered: English Literature, English Language

English Literature
English Language

“Hi, my name is Tim and I am currently studying English Literature at Bristol University.Since I was young I have been enthusiastic about literature and the English language. I believe literature to be one of the cornerstones of human...”

About the author

£18 /hr

Srishti D.

Degree: English and Comparative Literature Studies (Q300) (Bachelors) - Warwick University

Subjects offered: English Literature, History+ 4 more

English Literature
History
Geography
English
-Personal Statements-
-Oxbridge Preparation-

“About Me: I am a first year English Literature undergraduate at the University of Warwick . I have always loved the freedom the subject affords you, it takes you to a place where as long as you can substantiate your argument then you c...”

You may also like...

Posts by Srishti

How does glacial retreat pose a threat to the areas in which it occurs?

To what extent does Keats use metaphor to respond to death in ‘Ode to a Nightingale’?

What is the best to approach the analysis of an unseen text?

What is the best way to write a strong argument?

Other GCSE English Literature questions

What is are metaphors and why are they used?

How do I prepare for an English Literature exam?

Explore the ways in which pride is used as a theme in Antigone. Consider the dramatic techniques used by Sophocles and show how his choices of language, structure and style shape the meaning.

How does writing reflect the audiences and purposes for which it was intended ?

View GCSE English Literature tutors

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok