22804 questions

How can I write a full answer in the short amount of time given in the exam?

By practicing lots of past paper questions, I will make sure that you understand the necessary structure of an answer. This includes the steps needed for an introduction, the main body of the answer, including balanced arguments, and finally what you need in a conclusion. This structure will remain the same for all answers, and the only thing that will change each time is the content of the answer, which comes from creative thinking, which we will also remember. I have many quirky ways of remembering how to structure essays, in the order required for the exam, therefore you shouldn't have any timing issues as you'll be ready to go with a time limit for each paragraph! 
See more
Sonia A.

Answered by Sonia, who tutored English GCSE with MyTutor

784 views

What is a critical analysis?

A critical analysis is a description of what you, the reader, understand from the text. This shouldn't be from context you have researched or analysis of hypothesis posed by secondary critics, rather it is your analysis of the language, tone and structure of the text and what all of these together mean for the text. What message do they convey? What is the author trying to tell us? Why has she/he used short chapters? What is the significance of repetition in a chapter? And so on. 
See more
Emily S.

Answered by Emily, English Literature A Level tutor with MyTutor

874 views

How do I approach Shakespeare?

The key to Shakespeare's work is understanding them. Grasping their meaning and understanding the language. Once you have that, you can begin to analyse any Shakespearean text. The meaning behind the text is what most examiners and teachers are looking for, but you have to justify your understanding of the text's message with language analysis. One can easily be absorbed in the symbols and meaning of sonnets and plays, but they have to be supported by firm analysis from which you infer your suppositions about the text. 
See more
Emily S.

Answered by Emily, English Literature A Level tutor with MyTutor

659 views

How do I learn quotes for my exam?

It's important to identify the general themes in the texts you are studying. Once you've pulled out the themes, then begin to look for quotes that back up that theme, relate to the theme. Don't rehearse extensive passages, but short lines that you fully understand and can explain or paraphrase. If you can't remember the direct quote, you will not be penalised for paraphrasing.  Once you have your themes and quotes, make mind maps connecting them all. For example, write down the theme of "death" and surround it with a minimum of six quotes that illustrate that theme in the text. 
See more
Emily S.

Answered by Emily, English Literature A Level tutor with MyTutor

641 views

How do you conjugate the verb to run (бегать; pronounced 'begat') in present tense?

I run: ​я бегу (ya begu)
You run: ты бежишЬ (ty bezhysh)
He/she runs: он/она бежит (on/ana bezhyt)
We run: мы бежим (my bezhym)
You (plural) run: вы бежите (vy bezhyte)
They run: они бегут (ani begut)
See more
Valentin D.

Answered by Valentin, Russian IB tutor with MyTutor

558 views

How do I multiply two matrices together?

In order to multiply two matrices together, you must first have that the number of columns in the first matrix must be equal to the the number of rows in the second matrix. So if you wish to multiply matrix A and matrix B, matrix A must have dimensions ( m x n ) whilst matrix B must have dimensions ​(​n ​x q) . Once you multiply these matrices, the new matrix formed will have dimension m xq​ . (Note that m and q can be equal) For example, matrix A can have dimension 3x2 and matrix B can have dimension 2x4 and so the new matrix will have dimension 3x4. To multiply matrices, you take the first row of Matrix A and multiply its elements by the elements in the first column of Matrix B. You then take the first row of Matrix A and multiply its elements by the elements in the second column of Matrix B. You then keep repeating this process till you have multiplied the elements of the first row of Matrix A to the elements of  every single column of Matrix B. You then take the second row of Matrix A and multiply its elements by the elements of the first column of Matrix B. You then take the second row of Matrix A and multiply it by the elements of the second column of Matrix B. You keep doing this till you have multiplied the second row of Matrix A by every single column of matrix B. You then repeat this process for the third, fourth, fifth (and so on...) row of matrix A.  The following example should make this clear. EXAMPLE ​Matrix A is ( A B )    and Matrix B is ( 1 2 3 4 )                      ( C D )                                   ( 5 6 7 8)  The dimension of A is 2x2 and the dimension of B is 2x4. Hence, the dimension of the new matrix shall be 2x4. Using the above rules, it should be simple to follow that new matrix is: [ (1a+5b)   (2a+6b)   (3a+7b)  (4a+8b) ​] [ (​1c+5d  ​(​2c+6d)​   (3c+7d)   (4c+8d) ​] Also note that matrix A multiplied by matrix B does not yield the same result as matrix B multiplied by matrix A. The order in which you multiply matrices matters.
See more
Iretunde S.

Answered by Iretunde, Maths A Level tutor with MyTutor

1025 views

Which was the most important battle in WWII?

According to many major historians, the most important battle was the Battle of Stalingrad. Stalingrad was the place that Nazi army loose for the first time before the Nazi army had earned the status of the unbeatable something that believes and some ally generals. So, the battle of Stalingrad was the proof that Nazi could lose a fight and also has some disadvantages that before was not able to be identified. Also, Hitler lost in the Barbarossa operation a lot of elite forces as punchers battalions who lead the attack and had the famous General Guderian as a leader. Another reason that Stalingrad battle was so important is that Nazi forces lost a lot of men, tanks and airplanes attempting to conquer Stalingrad and after their defeat, the Red Amry did not have big difficulties to take back the lost lands and to push the Nazi forces back to their country.According to many major historians, the most important battle was the Battle of Stalingrad. Stalingrad was the place that Nazi army loose for the first time before the Nazi army had earned the status of the unbeatable something that believes and some ally generals. So, the battle of Stalingrad was the proof that Nazi could lose a fight and also has some disadvantages that before was not able to be identified. Also, Hitler lost in the Barbarossa operation a lot of elite forces as punchers battalions who lead the attack and had the famous General Guderian as a leader. Another reason that Stalingrad battle was so important is that Nazi forces lost a lot of men, tanks and airplanes attempting to conquer Stalingrad and after their defeat, the Red Amry did not have big difficulties to take back the lost lands and to push the Nazi forces back to their country.  
See more
Anastasios Odysseas T.

Answered by Anastasios Odysseas, History IB tutor with MyTutor

718 views

A bromoalkane contains 34.9% carbon and 6.60% hydrogen by mass. The rest of the mass is made up by bromine. What is the empirical formula of this molecule?

A bromoalkane is a molecule which contains bromine, carbon and hydrogen (and nothing else) and has no carbon-carbon double bonds. An empirical formula gives the simplest ratio of atoms in a molecule. Here's how I'd go about tackling this question:1) Work out the % bromine by mass: 100 - 34.9 - 6.60 = 58.5%, so this is the % mass as we are told the rest of the mass comes from bromine.2) Work out the number of moles of C, H and Br: moles of C = mass/Ar = 34.9/12 = 2.91 (we can use "% mass" as "mass" because we are simply working out a ratio of the atoms relative to each other). Similarly, moles of H = 6.60/1 = 6.60. Moles of Br = 58.5/79.9 = 0.732.3) Work out the whole number ratio of the C:H:Br. You can do this by dividing all the moles by the value for the smallest numeber of moles (i.e. 0.732 moles of bromine). So 2.91 moles of C becomes 3.98 (because 2.91/0.732 = 3.98); 6.60 moles of H becomes 9.02; 0.732 moles of Br becomes 1. As these values are all very close to whole numbers we can simply round them to the nearest, so the ratio of C:H:Br is 4:9:14) You can conclude that the empirical formula of the bromoalkane is C4H9Br
See more
Ed W.

Answered by Ed, Chemistry A Level tutor with MyTutor

1474 views
Need help with school?
Boost your grades with stress-free tuition that fits your schedule.

Your difficult questions, answered

Our tutors get asked all sorts of hard questions in their Online Lessons. They use this page to write up the most common questions so you can access them for free.

Wondering how MyTutor works?

Here's a two minute explanation.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How do we connect with a tutor?

Who are the tutors?

How much does tuition cost?

How do Online Lessons work?

How it works

mtw:mercury1:status:ok