22851 questions

“Is “Ethical” Consumerism A Solution To Poverty, Or A Dangerous Distraction?”

Argumentation is fundamental for a TSA essay - the purpose of the essay is NOT to give a balanced view of the argument demonstrating a sensibility to both sides, the purpose IS to create an argument that can convince the reader of your viewpoint and stance.
To that effect, the first step is to pick a side of the argument to fall down on - often it is better to pick a side less frequently argued and more conventionally controversial to demonstrate your unique ability to reason and argue. Also if it’s an argument that you don’t actually believe in, it will force you to follow the logic more rationally in order to make it as consistent as possible.
Example plan of argumentation:Introduction: frame the argument in a clear and precise way that gives you the freedom to expound - E.g. “Whether or not “ethical” consumerism, namely, the disregarding of consumption in accordance with the maximally efficient price (as determined by free market forces) in favour of consumption at artificially higher prices (as determined by socially-minded economic interventionists) rests on the definition of poverty undertaken in the argument. Poverty must be considered to refer to absolute levels of income and wealth not relative terms of inequality. To this end, “ethical” consumerism must be evaluated against whether or not it can alleviate the resource deprivation and economic isolation associated with absolute poverty, not whether it acts as a plausible method of progressive economic redistribution.”Argument 1 - the price mechanism is the most efficient way of allocating resources, any impediment on the price mechanism will create an inefficient and sub-optimal usage of resources. Argument 2 - “ethical” consumerism does nothing to address the causes of poverty; there is no focus towards education, healthcare, long-term economic development, or security that will alleviate the causes of poverty. Argument 3 - focusing the effort and financial capital wasted in a programme of “ethical” consumerism harms the consumer and, rather hypocritically, prices out of consumption those consumers with the least financial resources to begin with. As more goods were to see their prices rise with “ethical” consumerism as the driving force of price allocation, those economic agents we seek to assist out of poverty will only be further trapped by the higher pricing of “ethical” consumerism on an array of products. Optional Dismissed Counter-Argument 4 - whilst is can be argued that “ethical” consumerism can provide the means for incubating an industry that, in its conception, would have been eradicated from the comparative advantage other established competitors might have, and that those without the economic resources to consume “ethically” would not be forced to, this argument misses the point that any sub-optional misapplication of resources harms both consumers and producers on the margin of poverty first. Any inefficient allocation of resources has to be felt somewhere, and it is not with those with the means to consume “ethically”. Conclusion: take a firm stand and conclude concisely along the lines of your argumentation. It may be worthwhile saving a subtle new insight for the conclusion to provide the reader with a longer food for thought at the end - “E.g. “”Ethical” consumerism should, therefore, be considered in the same light as international emergency aid. An exogenous, financial injection designed to alleviate short-term economic suffering. If, however, “ethical” consumerism is to be considered as an authentic long-term solution to poverty, it’s price-mechanism distortion and efficiency incentivising corrosion will only deepen the causes of entrenched structural poverty, and fail to alleviate their symptoms. “Ethical” consumerism is nothing more than a well intentioned economic misdirect aimed at the symptom of poverty - regrettably, such a simple solution will do next to nothing to alleviate it’s cause.”
If you keep in the forefront of your mind that the TSA essay is a place to demonstrate your ability to argue through reason, with logic as the guiding force, you’ll write a sterling essay in ample time.
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Daniel W.

Answered by Daniel, TSA Oxford University tutor with MyTutor

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“Is “Ethical” Consumerism A Solution To Poverty, Or A Dangerous Distraction?”

Argumentation is fundamental for a TSA essay - the purpose of the essay is NOT to give a balanced view of the argument demonstrating a sensibility to both sides, the purpose IS to create an argument that can convince the reader of your viewpoint and stance.
To that effect, the first step is to pick a side of the argument to fall down on - often it is better to pick a side less frequently argued and more conventionally controversial to demonstrate your unique ability to reason and argue. Also if it’s an argument that you don’t actually believe in, it will force you to follow the logic more rationally in order to make it as consistent as possible.
Example plan of argumentation:Introduction: frame the argument in a clear and precise way that gives you the freedom to expound - E.g. “Whether or not “ethical” consumerism, namely, the disregarding of consumption in accordance with the maximally efficient price (as determined by free market forces) in favour of consumption at artificially higher prices (as determined by socially-minded economic interventionists) rests on the definition of poverty undertaken in the argument. Poverty must be considered to refer to absolute levels of income and wealth not relative terms of inequality. To this end, “ethical” consumerism must be evaluated against whether or not it can alleviate the resource deprivation and economic isolation associated with absolute poverty, not whether it acts as a plausible method of progressive economic redistribution.”Argument 1 - the price mechanism is the most efficient way of allocating resources, any impediment on the price mechanism will create an inefficient and sub-optimal usage of resources. Argument 2 - “ethical” consumerism does nothing to address the causes of poverty; there is no focus towards education, healthcare, long-term economic development, or security that will alleviate the causes of poverty. Argument 3 - focusing the effort and financial capital wasted in a programme of “ethical” consumerism harms the consumer and, rather hypocritically, prices out of consumption those consumers with the least financial resources to begin with. As more goods were to see their prices rise with “ethical” consumerism as the driving force of price allocation, those economic agents we seek to assist out of poverty will only be further trapped by the higher pricing of “ethical” consumerism on an array of products. Optional Dismissed Counter-Argument 4 - whilst is can be argued that “ethical” consumerism can provide the means for incubating an industry that, in its conception, would have been eradicated from the comparative advantage other established competitors might have, and that those without the economic resources to consume “ethically” would not be forced to, this argument misses the point that any sub-optional misapplication of resources harms both consumers and producers on the margin of poverty first. Any inefficient allocation of resources has to be felt somewhere, and it is not with those with the means to consume “ethically”. Conclusion: take a firm stand and conclude concisely along the lines of your argumentation. It may be worthwhile saving a subtle new insight for the conclusion to provide the reader with a longer food for thought at the end - “E.g. “”Ethical” consumerism should, therefore, be considered in the same light as international emergency aid. An exogenous, financial injection designed to alleviate short-term economic suffering. If, however, “ethical” consumerism is to be considered as an authentic long-term solution to poverty, it’s price-mechanism distortion and efficiency incentivising corrosion will only deepen the causes of entrenched structural poverty, and fail to alleviate their symptoms. “Ethical” consumerism is nothing more than a well intentioned economic misdirect aimed at the symptom of poverty - regrettably, such a simple solution will do next to nothing to alleviate it’s cause.”
If you keep in the forefront of your mind that the TSA essay is a place to demonstrate your ability to argue through reason, with logic as the guiding force, you’ll write a sterling essay in ample time.
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Daniel W.

Answered by Daniel, TSA Oxford University tutor with MyTutor

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What's the difference between fixed and variable costs?

Fixed are costs that do not change with the level of output. For example, heating bills would be a fixed cost. Whether we make 100 computers or 300 computers, our fixed costs do not change. Variable costs are costs that do change with output, for example packaging. If we make 100 computers and our packaging costs are £5 per computer, the our packaging costs would be £500. This would then change if we were to make 300 computers as our cost is not £900.
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Will N.

Answered by Will, Business Studies GCSE tutor with MyTutor

1 view

“Is “Ethical” Consumerism A Solution To Poverty, Or A Dangerous Distraction?”

Argumentation is fundamental for a TSA essay - the purpose of the essay is NOT to give a balanced view of the argument demonstrating a sensibility to both sides, the purpose IS to create an argument that can convince the reader of your viewpoint and stance.
To that effect, the first step is to pick a side of the argument to fall down on - often it is better to pick a side less frequently argued and more conventionally controversial to demonstrate your unique ability to reason and argue. Also if it’s an argument that you don’t actually believe in, it will force you to follow the logic more rationally in order to make it as consistent as possible.
Example plan of argumentation:Introduction: frame the argument in a clear and precise way that gives you the freedom to expound - E.g. “Whether or not “ethical” consumerism, namely, the disregarding of consumption in accordance with the maximally efficient price (as determined by free market forces) in favour of consumption at artificially higher prices (as determined by socially-minded economic interventionists) rests on the definition of poverty undertaken in the argument. Poverty must be considered to refer to absolute levels of income and wealth not relative terms of inequality. To this end, “ethical” consumerism must be evaluated against whether or not it can alleviate the resource deprivation and economic isolation associated with absolute poverty, not whether it acts as a plausible method of progressive economic redistribution.”Argument 1 - the price mechanism is the most efficient way of allocating resources, any impediment on the price mechanism will create an inefficient and sub-optimal usage of resources. Argument 2 - “ethical” consumerism does nothing to address the causes of poverty; there is no focus towards education, healthcare, long-term economic development, or security that will alleviate the causes of poverty. Argument 3 - focusing the effort and financial capital wasted in a programme of “ethical” consumerism harms the consumer and, rather hypocritically, prices out of consumption those consumers with the least financial resources to begin with. As more goods were to see their prices rise with “ethical” consumerism as the driving force of price allocation, those economic agents we seek to assist out of poverty will only be further trapped by the higher pricing of “ethical” consumerism on an array of products. Optional Dismissed Counter-Argument 4 - whilst is can be argued that “ethical” consumerism can provide the means for incubating an industry that, in its conception, would have been eradicated from the comparative advantage other established competitors might have, and that those without the economic resources to consume “ethically” would not be forced to, this argument misses the point that any sub-optional misapplication of resources harms both consumers and producers on the margin of poverty first. Any inefficient allocation of resources has to be felt somewhere, and it is not with those with the means to consume “ethically”. Conclusion: take a firm stand and conclude concisely along the lines of your argumentation. It may be worthwhile saving a subtle new insight for the conclusion to provide the reader with a longer food for thought at the end - “E.g. “”Ethical” consumerism should, therefore, be considered in the same light as international emergency aid. An exogenous, financial injection designed to alleviate short-term economic suffering. If, however, “ethical” consumerism is to be considered as an authentic long-term solution to poverty, it’s price-mechanism distortion and efficiency incentivising corrosion will only deepen the causes of entrenched structural poverty, and fail to alleviate their symptoms. “Ethical” consumerism is nothing more than a well intentioned economic misdirect aimed at the symptom of poverty - regrettably, such a simple solution will do next to nothing to alleviate it’s cause.”
If you keep in the forefront of your mind that the TSA essay is a place to demonstrate your ability to argue through reason, with logic as the guiding force, you’ll write a sterling essay in ample time.
See more
Daniel W.

Answered by Daniel, TSA Oxford University tutor with MyTutor

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How is the human body used in Wilfred Owen's poem 'Mental Cases'?

The human body is broken down in 'Mental Cases' and is detached from the soldiers. Owen dehumanises the men, to better establish how the horror of the First World War is impacting them. He compares them to some sort of demon, unable to view them as human any more, 'Sure we have perished / Sleeping, and walk hell; but who these hellish?'. He struggles to identify with them, as established by the opening rhetorical question of 'Who are these?' Additionally, even the men's faces are no longer human, 'Thus their heads wear this hilarious, hideous, / Awful falseness of set-smiling corpses'. Owen describes the human body using abstract terms to dehumanise the soldiers, highlighting how their trauma is impacting them and making them forever different from the rest of humanity.
Beyond the soldiers, Owen uses the body as a way of describing the world around the patients. Here, he is highlighting how the war has bled into all of the world the soldiers are experiencing and they are unable to get the images of death out of their minds, 'Sunlight seems a bloodsmear: night comes blood-black; / Dawn breaks like a wound that bleeds afresh'. The trauma the soldiers have experienced is causing them to visualise their memories everywhere and they are unable to view reality without remembering images of death and bodies. This makes clear Owen's anti-war message, and shows a great awareness for the effects PTSD has on these patients.
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Callum W.

Answered by Callum, English A Level tutor with MyTutor

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What's the difference between fixed and variable costs?

Fixed are costs that do not change with the level of output. For example, heating bills would be a fixed cost. Whether we make 100 computers or 300 computers, our fixed costs do not change. Variable costs are costs that do change with output, for example packaging. If we make 100 computers and our packaging costs are £5 per computer, the our packaging costs would be £500. This would then change if we were to make 300 computers as our cost is not £900.
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Will N.

Answered by Will, Business Studies GCSE tutor with MyTutor

2 views

What's the difference between fixed and variable costs?

Fixed are costs that do not change with the level of output. For example, heating bills would be a fixed cost. Whether we make 100 computers or 300 computers, our fixed costs do not change. Variable costs are costs that do change with output, for example packaging. If we make 100 computers and our packaging costs are £5 per computer, the our packaging costs would be £500. This would then change if we were to make 300 computers as our cost is not £900.
See more
Will N.

Answered by Will, Business Studies GCSE tutor with MyTutor

1 view

What are your top exam tips for the longer writing question?

The main two tips I would give for the 150 word question are as follows: Read the questions at least twice and underline any key words.As there is a choice between two questions for this section, it is a good idea to make sure you understand what you are being asked to do for each one so that you can pick the one that suits you best. Underlining key words will help you focus on the points to make in your answer to ensure they are relevant. It is also important to check what tense the question is asking you to use. For example, in a past exam, the question was about a memorable day that you have had at school. This means that a past tense form was needed. Make a mini-plan.Quickly bullet pointing ideas is a good way of ensuring that you cover each of the things you are asked to write about. It also ensures that you don't veer off into talking about irrelevant material, or significantly go over the word limit as this could reduce accuracy of language marks for any mistakes you make past the 150 word target. Something that I found useful was creating myself a small checklist for things I knew I needed to include in my answer. For example, I wrote 'variety of tenses', 'opinions and justifications', 'adjectival agreement' etc and ticked them off as I did them. This can also come in handy when checking over your work at the end.
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Emma W.

Answered by Emma, Spanish GCSE tutor with MyTutor

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